Frederick C. Crews is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Follies of the Wise: Dissenting Essays.

IN THE REVIEW

Physician, Heal Thyself: Part II

Sigmund Freud and Wilhelm Fliess, early 1890s
In the first part of this essay, a review of books by Gerald Imber and Howard Markel, we saw that William Halsted and Sigmund Freud, though superficially alike in their concern for medical applications of cocaine, were attracted to the drug for different reasons.1 Halsted had one goal in …

Physician, Heal Thyself: Part I

Sigmund Freud and Martha Bernays during their engagement, Wandsbeck, near Hamburg, 1885

Genius on the Edge: The Bizarre Double Life of Dr. William Stewart Halsted

by Gerald Imber

An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted, and the Miracle Drug Cocaine

by Howard Markel
Among American surgeons, William Stewart Halsted (1852–1922) was never the most dexterous or brilliant. Indeed, he wasn’t even minimally reliable during the second half of his forty-two-year surgical career. Offering spurious excuses, he absented himself for long periods from his duties at the Johns Hopkins University Hospital. When on hand, …

Talking Back to Prozac

The Loss of Sadness: How Psychiatry Transformed Normal Sorrow into Depressive Disorder

by Allan V. Horwitz and Jerome C. Wakefield

Shyness: How Normal Behavior Became a Sickness

by Christopher Lane
During the summer of 2002, The Oprah Winfrey Show was graced by a visit from Ricky Williams, the Heisman Trophy holder and running back extraordinaire of the Miami Dolphins. Williams was there to confess that he suffered from painful and chronic shyness. Oprah and her audience were, of course, sympathetic.

Melville the Great

Melville: His World and Work

by Andrew Delbanco
It ought to be relatively easy by now to get a clear general view of Herman Melville, whose reputation has long been unsurpassed among American writers. Although he left relatively few documentary traces and went unnoticed through the last three quarters of a literary career that began in the 1840s …