Jacob Weisberg is Chairman of the Slate Group and the author of The Bush Tragedy, among other books. (March 2017)

IN THE REVIEW

How Megyn Kelly Won

Settle for More

by Megyn Kelly

The Loudest Voice in the Room: How the Brilliant, Bombastic Roger Ailes Built Fox News—and Divided a Country

by Gabriel Sherman
As she prepared to go live on the final night of the Republican Convention in Cleveland, Megyn Kelly found herself at the center of two converging stories. That afternoon, Rupert Murdoch had announced to Fox News staff around the world that Roger Ailes, the network’s cofounder and CEO, was resigning …

They’ve Got You, Wherever You Are

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg at the announcement of the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to ‘cure, prevent, or manage all disease’ by the end of the century, San Francisco, September 2016

The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads

by Tim Wu

Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley

by Antonio García Martínez
The old cliché about advertising was, “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don’t know which half.” The new cliché is, “If you’re not paying for it, you’re the product.” In an attention economy, you pay for free content and services with your time. The compensation isn’t very good.

We Are Hopelessly Hooked

Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age

by Sherry Turkle

Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other

by Sherry Turkle
We check our phones 221 times a day—an average of every 4.3 minutes—according to a UK study. This number actually may be too low, since people tend to underestimate their own mobile usage. In a 2015 Gallup survey, 61 percent of people said they checked their phones less frequently than others they knew. Our transformation into device people has happened with unprecedented suddenness.

TV vs. the Internet: Who Will Win?

Jeffrey Tambor as the transgender character Maura in Transparent, an Amazon Original series that can be watched only on the Internet

Television Is the New Television: The Unexpected Triumph of Old Media in the Digital Age

by Michael Wolff

Over the Top: How the Internet Is (Slowly but Surely) Changing the Television Industry

by Alan Wolk
Like the venture capitalists currently pumping investments into the new startups, Michael Wolff can be counted on to reverse his biases every few years or so: content is king; content is a dismal commodity; content is king again. The chief difference is that he is on a countercycle, endorsing old models when others embrace disruption and vice versa.