Jonathan Freedland is an editorial-page columnist for The Guardian. In 2014 he was awarded the Orwell Special Prize for journalism. (August 2016)

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Reality TV in Cleveland

Delegates at the Republican National Convention after the announcement that there would not be a roll-call vote on the Convention Rules Committee's report and proposed rules changes, Cleveland, Ohio, July 18, 2016

Trump’s candidacy rests on his experience as a business leader, on the notion that he is the CEO ready to run America, Inc. What he has demonstrated so far at the Republican convention in Cleveland is not deviation from an ideological norm, but simple ineptitude. And for a would-be chief executive to the nation, that’s not a good look.

IN THE REVIEW

Maggie & the Storm Over Europe

Margaret Thatcher, the new leader of the Conservative Party, campaigning for England to remain part of the European Economic Community, June 1975

Margaret Thatcher: At Her Zenith: In London, Washington and Moscow

by Charles Moore
In early February, before the date had even been set for the June 23 referendum that will decide whether Britain remains a member of the European Union, the governing Conservative Party began a fight with itself over how Margaret Thatcher would have voted. Her former private secretary Charles Powell (pronounced …

The Best Man Among Us

Tony Judt, New York City, 2006

When the Facts Change: Essays, 1995–2010

by Tony Judt, edited and with an introduction by Jennifer Homans
Freedom from dogma is the golden thread that runs through When the Facts Change, a collection of Tony Judt’s essays—many of them first published in The New York Review—from 1995 until his premature death in 2010, aged sixty-two, from Lou Gehrig’s disease. The volume is staggeringly broad in its range, testament to the extraordinary eclecticism of Judt’s interests and knowledge.

The Liberal Zionists

Israeli soldiers on a hill overlooking an Israeli settlement in Ofra, the West Bank, 2001

My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel

by Ari Shavit

Genesis: Truman, American Jews, and the Origins of the Arab/Israeli Conflict

by John B. Judis
In the toxic environment that characterizes much, if not most, debate on the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians, a special poison is reserved for the liberal Zionist.

NYR DAILY

The End of Republicanism?

Vanessa Trump, Donald Trump, Jr., Donald Trump, Ivanka Trump, and Tiffany Trump, on the third day of the Republican National Convention, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 20, 2016

After the convention, many Republicans are worried that Trumpism does not respect the prudent, cautious, free-market conservatism they value. Trump is turning his back on decades of Republican Party doctrine and, for millennials especially, making the Republican Party a “toxic brand.”

From Brexit to Trump?

A mural showing Donald Trump sharing a kiss with former London Mayor and leading Brexit supporter Boris Johnson, Bristol, England, May 24, 2016

Brexit suggests that when the white, poor, angry, and left-behind constituency can be allied to a conservative cause that has millions of other, more ideologically-motivated devotees, victory is possible. It suggests that hostility to migrants, a cynical trampling on the truth, and a cavalier disdain for expertise can work wonders, such is the loathing of anything that can be associated with the “elite.”

Netanyahu’s Churchill Syndrome

Benjamin Netanyahu

Netanyahu has been re-enacting the Churchill story for more than two decades: as a junior member of the Knesset, he was warning that Iran was just “three to five years” away from a nuclear bomb back in 1992. He’s sounded the same alarm at intervals ever since. The great value of Churchill syndrome to one who suffers from it is that it is self-vindicating. The more Netanyahu’s warnings of the Tehran menace are dismissed, the greater his similarity to the cigar-chomping seer who was fatefully ignored in the 1930s.

What Scotland Won

Runners at the start of the 2014 Perth Kilt Run

British prime minister David Cameron promised that if Scotland voted No, Scotland would be rewarded with much greater autonomy. So Cameron is now honor-bound to cede many new powers to Scotland—moving closer to “devo-max,” or maximum devolution—at breakneck speed: the timetable published on the eve of the referendum speaks in weeks and months rather than years.