Contents


Fighting for the Crown

Wise Children by Angela Carter

Love by Angela Carter

The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories by Angela Carter

Heroes and Villains by Angela Carter

The Infernal Desire Machines of Dr. Hoffman by Angela Carter

Come Unto These Yellow Sands by Angela Carter

The Old Wives’ Fairy Tale Book edited by Angela Carter

The Sadeian Woman and the Ideology of Pornography by Angela Carter

What Can Save the Economy?

Head to Head: The Coming Economic Battle Among Japan, Europe, and America by Lester Thurow

State of the Union Address and ‘Highlights of the President’s Growth Agenda’ by George Bush

A Call to Economic Arms: Forging a New American Mandate by Paul E. Tsongas

A Plan for America’s Future by Bill Clinton

De Gaulle and His Myth

De Gaulle: Vol. I, The Rebel: 1890-1944 by Jean Lacouture, translated by Patrick O'Brian

De Gaulle: Vol. II, The Ruler: 1945-1970 by Jean Lacouture, translated by Alan Sheridan

The New Civil War

Rethinking Social Policy: Race, Poverty, and the Underclass by Christopher Jencks

Racism and Justice: The Case for Affirmative Action by Gertrude Ezorsky

The Black Elite: Facing the Color Line in the Twilight of the Twentieth Century by Lois Benjamin

Race: How Blacks and Whites Think and Feel About the American Obsession by Studs Terkel

Contributors

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written over seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty. His ­memoir, A Tokyo Romance, has just been published. (April 2018)

John Gregory Dunne (1932–2003) was a novelist, screenwriter and critic. His final novel is entitled Nothing Lost.

Amos Elon (1926–2009) was an Israeli journalist. His final book was The Pity of It All: A Portrait of Jews In Germany 1743 – 1933.

James Fallows is National Correspondent for The Atlantic.His books include Free Flight: Inventing the Future of Travel, Blind into Baghdad: America’s War in Iraq, and China Airborne.

Jamey Gambrell is a writer on Russian art and culture. She has translated works by Marina Tsvetaeva and Tatyana Tolstaya, in addition to Vladimir Sorokin’s three-volume Ice Trilogy and his Day of the ­Oprichnik. Her translation of Sorokin’s novel The Blizzard will be published in December 2015.


Andrew Hacker teaches political science and mathematics at Queens College. His new book, The Math Myth and Other STEM ­Delusions, will appear next March.
 (July 2015)

Robert Hughes (1938–2012) was an art critic and television writer. In the award-winning documentary series, The Shock of The New, Hughes recounted the development of modern art since the Impressionists; in The Fatal Shore, he explored the history of his native Australia. Hughes’s memoir, Things I Didn’t Know, was published in 2006.

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Jeri Laber, Senior Advisor to Human Rights Watch, was formerly executive director of its Helsinki division. She is the author, with Barnett R. Rubin, of ‘A Nation is Dying’: Afghanistan Under the Soviets, 1979—1987. (January 1997)

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

Robert O. Paxton is Mellon Professor Emeritus of Social Science at Columbia and the author of The Anatomy of Fascism, Vichy France, and, with Michael Marrus, Vichy France and the Jews, among other works. (May 2018)

Garry Wills, whose most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters, is the 2018 commencement speaker at Zaytuna College, the first accredited Muslim campus in America. (June 2018)