Contents


Capturing Character

Jean-Antoine Houdon: Sculptor of the Enlightenment Catalog of the exhibition by Anne L. Poulet

Ein Versuch über die Gesichter Houdons by Willibald Sauerländer

Among the Savages

The Golovlyov Family by Shchedrin, translated from the Russian by Natalie Duddington, with an introduction by James Wood

Sketches of Provincial Life by Saltykov-Shchedrin, translated from the Russian and with notes by Frederic Aston

The History of a Town by Saltykov-Shchedrin, translated from the Russian and edited by Susan Brownsberger

The Pompadours: A Satire on the Art of Government by Saltykov-Shchedrin, translated from the Russian and with an introduction by David Magarshack

Beethoven Beyond Classicism

Late Beethoven: Music, Thought, Imagination by Maynard Solomon

Beethoven’s Ninth: A Political History by Esteban Buch, translated from the French by Richard Miller

God’s Houses Part II

Cistercian Europe: Architecture of Contemplation by Terryl N. Kinder

America’s Religious Architecture: Sacred Places for Every Community by Marilyn J. Chiat

Houses of God: Region, Religion, and Architecture in the United States by Peter W. Williams

Architecture for the Gods by Michael J. Crosbie

Sacred Architecture by Caroline Humphrey and Piers Vitebsky

Re-Pitching the Tent: Reordering the Church Building for Worship and Mission by Richard Giles

Building from Belief: Advance, Retreat, and Compromise in the Remaking of Catholic Church Architecture by Michael E. DeSanctis

Ugly as Sin: Why They Changed Our Churches from Sacred Places to Meeting Spaces—and How We Can Change Them Back Again by Michael S. Rose

When Church Became Theatre: The Transformation of Evangelical Architecture and Worship in Nineteenth-Century America by Jeanne Halgren Kilde

The New Religious Image of Urban America: The Shopping Mall as Ceremonial Center by Ira G. Zepp Jr

Contributors

Anne Applebaum is a columnist for The Washington Post and Slate. Her most recent book is Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944–1956.
 (June 2013)

Andrew Butterfield is President of Andrew Butterfield Fine Arts and the author of The Sculptures of Andrea del Verrocchio.
 (June 2014)

James Chace is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Government and Public Law at Bard College. He is the author of Acheson and, most recently, 1912: The Election That Changed the Country. He is now working on a biography of Lafayette. (October 2004)

Helen Epstein is a writer specializing in public health and an adjunct professor at Bard College. She has advised numerous organizations, including the United States Agency for International Development, the World Bank, Human Rights Watch, and UNICEF. She is the author of The Invisible Cure: Why We Are Losing the Fight Against AIDS in Africa and has contributed articles to many publications, including The New York Review of Books and The New York Times Magazine.

Mark Ford’s Selected Poems will be published in April. He teaches in the English Department at University College London. (February 2014)

Misha Glenny is the author of The Balkans: Nationalism, War, and the Great Powers, 1804–1999. (July 2003)

Elizabeth Hardwick (1916-2007) was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and educated at the University of Kentucky and Columbia University. A recipient of a Gold Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she is the author of three novels, a biography of Herman Melville, and four collections of essays. She was a co-founder and advisory editor of The New York Review of Books and contributed more than one hundred reviews, articles, reflections, and letters to the magazine. NYRB Classics publishes Sleepless Nights, a novel, and Seduction and Betrayal, a study of women in literature.

Stephen Kinzer, a former New York Times bureau chief in Nica­ragua, is a visiting fellow at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown. His new book is The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War. (December 2013)

Lewis Lockwood is Fanny Peabody Research Professor of Music at Harvard. He is the author of Beethoven: The Music and the Life and, most recently, co-editor with Mark Kroll of The Beethoven Violin Sonatas: History, Criticism, Performance. (November 2004)

Alison Lurie is Frederic J. Whiton Professor of American Literature Emerita at Cornell. She is the author of two collections of essays on children’s literature, Don’t Tell the Grownups and Boys and Girls Forever, and the editor of The Oxford Book of Fairy Tales. Her most recent novel is Truth and Consequences.


Norman Mailer (1923-2007) was born in Long Branch, New Jersey, and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. In 1955 he co-founded The Village Voice. He is the author of more than thirty books, including The Naked and the Dead; The Armies of the Night, for which he won a National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize; The Executioner’s Song, for which he won his second Pulitzer Prize; Harlot’s Ghost; Oswald’s Tale; The Gospel According to the Son; and The Castle in the Forest.

Andrew O’Hagan’s new novel, The Illuminations, will be published early next year. (October 2014)

Luc Sante is the author of Low Life, Evidence, The Factory of Facts, Kill All Your Darlings, and Folk Photography. He has translated Félix Fénéon’s Novels in Three Lines and written the introduction to George Simenon’s The Man Who Watched Trains Go By (both available as NYRB Classics). He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard College.

Jennifer Schuessler is an editor at The New York Times Book Review. (March 2011)

Virginia Woolf (1882–1941) was a celebrated novelist, critic, and essayist. The excerpt in these pages is taken from Carlyle’s House and Other Sketches, the first edition of her recently discovered 1909 sketchbook, which is being published on July 15 by Hesperus Press. (July 2003)

Christopher de Bellaigue was born in London in 1971 and has worked as a journalist in the Middle East and South Asia since 1994. His first book, In the Rose Garden of the Martyrs: A Memoir of Iran, was shortlisted for the Royal Society of Literature’s Ondaatje Prize. His latest book is Patriot of Persia: Muhammad Mossadegh and a Tragic Anglo-American Coup. He lives in Tehran with his wife and two children.