Contents


Marilyn

MM—Personal: From the Private Archive of Marilyn Monroe edited by Lois Banner, with photographs by Mark Anderson

Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters by Marilyn Monroe, edited by Stanley Buchthal and Bernard Comment

The Life and Opinions of Maf the Dog, and of His Friend Marilyn Monroe by Andrew O'Hagan

Gossart: The Glow of Inspiration

Man, Myth, and Sensual Pleasures: Jan Gossart’s Renaissance an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, October 5, 2010–January 17, 2011; and the National Gallery, London, February 23–May 30, 2011

Invisible Black America

The Presumption of Guilt: The Arrest of Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Race, Class, and Crime in America by Charles J. Ogletree Jr.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

Revolution Without Violence?

Civil Resistance and Power Politics: The Experience of Non-violent Action from Gandhi to the Present edited by Adam Roberts and Timothy Garton Ash

Facts Are Subversive: Political Writing from a Decade Without a Name by Timothy Garton Ash

Contributors

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.

Andrew Butterfield is President of Andrew Butterfield Fine Arts and the author of The Sculptures of Andrea del Verrocchio.
 (June 2014)

Dan Chiasson’s fourth collection of poetry is Bicentennial.
 (August 2014)

Elizabeth Drew is a regular contributor to The New York Review and the former Washington correspondent of The New Yorker and The Atlantic.

 (September 2013)

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Joshua Hammer is a former Newsweek bureau chief and correspondent-at-large in Africa and the Middle East. His new book, Taking Timbuktu, will be published next year. His report in this issue was supported by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.
 (May 2014)

Ian Johnson is a Beijing-based correspondent for The New York Times. He won a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of China, and is writing a book on China’s search for values. (June 2014)

Garry Kasparov is the chairman of the United Civil Front, a Russian pro-democracy group opposing the administration of Vladimir Putin. In 1985 he became the youngest player ever to win the World Chess Championship and remained the top-ranked chess player in the world for twenty years until retiring from professional chess in 2005. (March 2011)

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

Joyce Carol Oates is currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Writing Program at NYU. Her most recent novel is Carthage.

Darryl Pinckney, a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, is the author of a novel, High Cotton, and Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature. He lives in New York City.

Timothy Snyder is Housum Professor of History at Yale and the author of Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin. This month, he is to deliver a Philippe Roman Lecture on the origins of the Holocaust at the London School of Economics. (March 2014)

Colin Thubron is the president of the Royal Society of Literature. Among his books are The Lost Heart of Asia, Shadow of the Silk Road, and, most recently, To a Mountain in Tibet. (December 2013)

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life. His article in this issue draws on his essay in Tyringham Topics.
 (February 2013)

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown. His latest book is The Idea of America: Reflections on the Birth of the United States.