Heather Ann Thompson is a Professor of History at the University of Michigan. Her book Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy won the Pulitzer Prize in History.
 (October 2018)

IN THE REVIEW

An Enduring Shame

‘Because She Was Susceptible’; aquatint by Francisco Goya from Los Caprichos, 1797–1799

The Trials of Nina McCall: Sex, Surveillance, and the Decades-Long Government Plan to Imprison “Promiscuous” Women

by Scott Wasserman Stern
According to The Trials of Nina McCall: Sex, Surveillance, and the Decades-Long Government Plan to Imprison “Promiscuous” Women, a new book by the law student Scott Stern, a shocking number of American girls and women were locked up beginning in the 1910s as part of the now completely forgotten “American Plan,” a governmental effort to combat venereal disease. Stern happened upon this unnerving piece of history largely by accident when he was an undergraduate poking around the stacks of the Yale libraries. His curiosity piqued, he spent almost a decade digging into archival collections, visiting decaying rural towns, and interviewing people in their living rooms, trying to understand what this program was and what its human cost might have been.