Melissa Chadburn is a contributing editor for the Economic Hardship Reporting Project and an editor-at-large for Dame Magazine. Her first novel, A Tiny Upward Shove, is forthcoming. (February 2018)

Follow Melissa Chadburn on Twitter: @melissachadburn.

NYR DAILY

The Food of My Youth

“Hot Cheetos,” a common snack costing a dollar from drive-through convenience stores that accept food stamps, McAllen, Texas, 2013

I’d look longingly at my white friends’ granola, brown rice, and multigrain bread. Trips to the grocery store were always loaded with feelings of shame and desire. Fresh produce was the most extravagant, exotic thing on the shelves, even though it was my people that had picked it in the Central Valley. And so I stood beside my single mother in line at the supermarket, arguing with the cashier about the high cost of our groceries. And when the Man handed over our food stamps, we were called moochers, a drain on our country.

Counting to a Hundred

Workers picketing a farm in Imperial Valley, California, 1968

I met a woman with a petition. This was something I could do. Get people to sign her petition. Her petition to get money from the government to build more schools and parks. I went to El Superior, the market on Figueroa in LA, and stood out in the hot sun. I drank pink and white and green Agua Frescas, and had folks sign my petition. One hundred. I wanted to get one hundred signatures a day, I decided. That would be magnificent.