Contents


Inside the Billway

Locked in the Cabinet by Robert B. Reich

Whatever It Takes: The Real Struggle for Political Power in America by Elizabeth Drew

Trail Fever: Spin Doctors, Rented Strangers, Thumb Wrestlers, Toe Suckers, Grizzly Bears, and Other Creatures on the Road to the White House by Michael Lewis

Is the CIA Necessary?

Operation PBSUCCESS: The United States and Guatemala 1952-1954 Intelligence Agency, Washington, D.C. by Nicholas Cullather. History Staff, Center for the Study of Intelligence, Central

CIA and Guatemala Assassination Proposals 1952-1954 by Gerald K. Haines. CIA History Staff Analysis

Reflections of a Cold Warrior: From Yalta to the Bay of Pigs by Richard M. Bissell Jr.

Secrecy: Report of the Commission on Protecting and Reducing Government Secrecy Chairmen: Daniel Patrick Moynihan and Larry Combest

Hello to Berlin

The Ghosts of Berlin: Confronting German History in the Urban Landscape by Brian Ladd

The Berlin of George Grosz: Drawings, Watercolours and Prints, 1912-1930 by Frank Whitford

Adolph Menzel (1815-1905): Between Romanticism and Impressionism edited by Claude Keisch, edited by Marie Ursula Riemann-Reyher

Berlin: The City and the Court Smith. by Jules Laforgue

George Grosz: Berlin-New York edited by Peter-Klaus Schuster

Reading Berlin 1900 by Peter Fritzsche

The Writing on the Walls: Projections in Berlin’s Jewish Quarter by Shimon Attie

Contributors

Joan Acocella is a staff writer for The New Yorker. Her most recent book is Twenty-eight Artists and Two Saints. She is writing a ­biography of Mikhail Baryshnikov. (May 2018)


Ian Buruma is the author of numerous books, including Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance, Year Zero: A History of 1945, and, most recently, A Tokyo Romance.

Rosemary Dinnage’s books include The Ruffian on the Stair, One to One: Experiences of Psychotherapy, and Annie Besant.

Theodore H. Draper (1912–2006) was an American historian. Educated at City College, he wrote influential studies of the American Communist Party, the Cuban Revolution and the Iran-Contra Affair. Draper was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 1990 recipient of the Herbert Feis Award from the American Historical Association.

Caroline Fraser’s most recent book, Rewilding the World: Dispatches from the Conservation Revolution, was published in December. (February 2019)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. His books include The Polish Revolution: Solidarity and The Magic Lantern: The Revolution of ’89 Witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin, and Prague.
 (August 2018)

Misha Glenny is the author of The Balkans: Nationalism, War, and the Great Powers, 1804–1999. (July 2003)

Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002) was an American geologist, biologist and historian of science. He taught at Harvard, where he was named Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology, and at NYU. His last book was Punctuated Equilibrium.

Anthony Grafton is Henry Putnam University Professor of History and the Humanities at Princeton University. His most recent book is The Culture of Correction in Renaissance Europe.


James Lardner is the founder of Inequality.org and the Communications Director at Americans for Financial Reform.
 (September 2015)

Jeff Madrick is the Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative at the Century Foundation and the Editor of Challenge. His most recent book is Seven Bad Ideas: How Mainstream Economists Damaged America and the World. (June 2018)

Louis Menand is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of English at Harvard. His books include The Marketplace of Ideas, American Studies and The Metaphysical Club.

Geoffrey O’Brien’s books include The Phantom Empire, Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012, and, most recently, the poetry collection The Blue Hill. (April 2019)

Derek Walcott is a poet, playwright, essayist, and visual artist. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1992. (November 2016)

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor Emeritus at Brown. His new book, Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, will be published in the fall.
 (May 2017)