Contents


The Moment of Moroni

Bellini, Titian, and Lotto: North Italian Paintings from the Accademia Carrara, Bergamo an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, May 15–September 3, 2012

Obama Abroad: The Report Card

Confront and Conceal: Obama’s Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power by David E. Sanger

The Obamians: The Struggle Inside the White House to Redefine American Power by James Mann

Dürer and Renoir

Der frühe Dürer [The Early Dürer] an exhibition at the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremberg, May 24–September 2, 2012

Renoir. Zwischen Bohème und Bourgeoisie: Die frühen Jahre [Renoir. Between Bohemia and the Bourgeoisie: The Early Years] an exhibition at the Kunstmuseum Basel, April 1–August 12, 2012

In the Cauldron

Eichmann’s Jews: The Jewish Administration of Holocaust Vienna, 1938–1945 by Doron Rabinovici, translated from the German by Nick Somers

The Nazi, The Painter and the Forgotten Story of the SS Road by G.H. Bennett

We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust by Ellen Cassedy

Contributors

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.
 (November 2016)

Christopher R. Browning is Frank Porter Graham Professor of History Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the author, most recently, of Remembering Survival: Inside a Nazi Slave-Labor Camp.
 (February 2019)

Roger Cohen is a columnist for The New York Times. His most recent book is the memoir The Girl from Human Street: Ghosts of Memory in a Jewish Family. (May 2016)

David Dollenmayer’s most recent translation is of Martin Walser’s A Gushing Fountain.
 (May 2016)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Yasmine El Rashidi is the author of The Battle for Egypt: Dispatches from the Revolution and Chronicle of a Last Summer: A Novel of Egypt. (June 2019)

Jeffrey Gettleman is the South Asia bureau chief for The New York Times and the author of Love, Africa: A Memoir of Romance, War, and Survival. He was awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 2012 for his reporting from Somalia and Sudan. (December 2017)

Robert Gottlieb has been the Editor in Chief of ­Simon and Schuster and of Knopf, and the Editor of The New Yorker. His most recent book is a collection of essays, Near-Death Experiences…and Others. (July 2019)

Alan Hollinghurst’s latest novel is The Sparsholt Affair. (December 2018)

Karl Kirchwey is Associate Dean of Faculty for the Humanities at Boston University, where he teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing. His most recent book is Stumbling Blocks: Roman Poems. 
He edited the Everyman’s Library Pocket Poets volume Poems of Rome. (April 2019)

Joseph Lelyveld’s most recent book is His Final Battle: The Last Months of Franklin Roosevelt. (November 2017)

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China. He was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London and China Correspondent for The Observer.
 (December 2016)

Joyce Carol Oates’s most recent book is Hazards of Time Travel. She is currently a Visiting Professor in the English Department at the University of California at Berkeley. (May 2019)

Geoffrey O’Brien’s books include The Phantom Empire, Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012, and, most recently, the poetry collection The Blue Hill. (April 2019)

Fintan O’Toole is a columnist with The Irish Times and the Leonard L. Milberg Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton. The Politics of Pain: Postwar England and the Road to Brexit will be published in the US in November. (June 2019)

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Out of My Head: On the Trail of Consciousness and the novel In Extremis.
 (May 2019)

Darryl Pinckney’s most recent book is a novel, Black Deutschland. (November 2018)

Willibald Sauerländer is a former Director of the Central Institute for Art History in Munich. His latest book is Manet Paints Monet: A Summer in Argenteuil. (May 2016)

Sanford Schwartz is the author of Christen Købke and ­William Nicholson.
 (May 2019)

Rory Stewart is Chairman of the Defence Committee of the House of Commons and the author of The Places in Between, among other books. He was previously the Ryan Professor of ­Human Rights at the Harvard Kennedy School.


Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast, the Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, and a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times. His new book is If We Can Keep It: How the Republic ­Collapsed, and How It Might Be Saved. (July 2019)

Helen Vendler is the Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor in the Department of English at Harvard. Her latest book is The Ocean, the Bird, and the Scholar, a collection of her most recent essays. (October 2017)

Jeremy Waldron is University Professor at the NYU School of Law. His books include The Harm in Hate Speech and, most recently, One Another’s Equals: The Basis of Human Equality.
 (June 2017)

Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas, Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book is To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science. His essay in this issue is based on the fourth annual Patrusky Lecture of the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, delivered in San Antonio in October 2016. (January 2017)

Stanley Wells is Honorary President of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and an Honorary Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. His two new books, Great Shakespeare Actors: From Burbage to Branagh and William Shakespeare: A Very Short Introduction, are to be published in June and September of this year. (March 2015)

Sean Wilentz is the George Henry Davis 1886 Professor of American History at Princeton. His latest book is No Property in Man: ­Slavery and Antislavery at the Nation’s Founding. (May 2019)