The Beleaguered Cambodians

For most foreigners, Cambodia seems to be a relatively stable country, hospitable to outside investment and welcoming. But beneath this outwardly acceptable face, longtime Prime Minister Hun Sen and his Cambodian People’s Party govern with absolute power and control all institutions that could challenge their authority. The freedoms of expression, association, and assembly are severely curtailed. Human rights organizations are intimidated, and a draft law aims to bring them under the regime’s authority. The judiciary is controlled by the executive, and the flawed laws that exist are selectively enforced. Hundreds of murders and violent attacks against politicians, journalists, labor leaders, and others critical of Hun Sen and his party remain unsolved.

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