Contents


The Ache in Eakins

Thomas Eakins:The Rowing Pictures An exhibition at the National Gallery, Washington, D. C., June 23-September 29, 1996; The Yale University Art Gallery, October 11, 1996-January 14, 1997; The Cleveland Museum of Art, February 15-May 15, 1997. Catalog of the exhibition by Helen A. Cooper, with contributions by Martin A. Berger and Christina Currie and Amy B. Werbel

The Best of Both Worlds

Pisanello the Museo di Castelvecchio, Verona, September 7
December 9, 1996
an exhibition at the Louvre, Paris, May 6
August 5, 1996, and at

Pisanello: le peintre aux sept vertus catalog of the exhibition, edited by Dominique Cordellier

Sex, Death, and the Courts

Compassion in Dying v. State of Washington, 79 F. 3d 790, United States Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit (1996)

Quill v. Vacco, 80 F. 3d 716, United States Court of Appeals, Second Circuit (1996)

Romer v. Evans, 116 S. Ct. 1620, United States Supreme Court (1996)

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Prudence Crowther is the copy chief at BusinessWeek. (April 2007)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (October 2017)

Richard Horton is a physician. He edits The Lancet, a weekly medical journal based in London and New York. He is also a visiting professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

David Lodge is a novelist and critic and Emeritus Professor of English Literature at the University of Birmingham, England. His novels include Changing Places, Small World, Nice Work, and A Man of Parts. His most recent works of criticism are Consciousness and the Novel and The Year of Henry James.

Jack F. Matlock Jr. is Rubenstein Fellow at Duke. He is the ­author of Autopsy on an Empire, Reagan and Gorbachev: How the Cold War Ended, and Superpower Illusions. Between 1987 and 1991 he was US ­Ambassador to the Soviet Union. (June 2016)

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Derek Walcott is a poet, playwright, essayist, and visual artist. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1992. (November 2016)

Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas, Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book is To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science. His essay in this issue is based on the fourth annual Patrusky Lecture of the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, delivered in San Antonio in October 2016. (January 2017)

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor Emeritus at Brown. His new book, Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, will be published in the fall.
 (May 2017)

Warren Zimmermann, a professor of international diplomacy at Columbia University, was US Ambassador to Yugoslavia from 1989 to 1992. A revised edition of his book, Origins of a Catastrophe:Yugoslavia and Its Destroyers, has just been published in paperback. (June 1999)