Contents


Prophet

Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde a play written and directed by Moisés Kaufman. at the Minetta Lane Theater, New York City

The Trials of Oscar Wilde: Deviance, Morality, and Late-Victorian Society by Michael S. Foldy

Oscar Wilde’s Last Stand: Decadence, Conspiracy, and the Most Outrageous Trial of the Century by Philip Hoare

Pioneer

Arthur Dove: A Retrospective 1998-April 12, 1998. byan exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, January 15, Catalog of the exhibition by Debra Bricker Balken, with William C. Agee and Elizabeth Hutton Turner

Louisiana Story

Degas in New Orleans: Encounters in the Creole World of Kate Chopin and George Washington Cable by Christopher Benfey

Masters and Servants by Pierre Michon, translated by Wyatt Alexander Mason

Justice for Blacks?

Race, Crime, and the Law by Randall Kennedy

Search and Destroy: African-American Males in the Criminal Justice System by Jerome G. Miller

Malign Neglect
Race, Crime, and Punishment in America
by Michael Tonry

The Art of the Possible

Pierre-Paul Prud’hon 12, 1998, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, March 10, 1998-June 7, 1998. by 1997-January an exhibition at the Grand Palais, Paris, September 23, Catalog of the exhibition by Sylvain Lavessière

Augustin Pajou, Royal Sculptor and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, February 26-May 24, 1998. byan exhibition at the Louvre, Paris, October 20, 1997-January 19, 1998, Catalog of the exhibition by James David Draper and Guilhelm Scherf

Contributors

Kwame Anthony Appiah teaches philosophy at Princeton. His latest book is The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen.

 (November 2012)

J.M. Coetzee is Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide. He is the author of sixteen works of fiction, as well as many works of criticism and translation. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003.
 (January 2017)

Joan Didion is the author, most recently, of Blue Nights and The Year of Magical Thinking, among seven other works of nonfiction. Her five novels include A Book of Common Prayer and Democracy.
 (May 2016)

Thomas R. Edwards (1928–2005) was Professor of English at Rutgers and editor of Raritan. His last book was Over Here: Criticizing America.

Jason Epstein, former Editorial Director at Random House, was a founder of The New York Review and of the Library of America. He is the author of Eating: A Memoir. (Dectember 2013)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (October 2017)

P. N. Furbank is the author of nine books, including biographies of Samuel Butler, Italo Svevo, and E.M. Forster.

John Gross (1935–2011) was an English editor and critic. From 1974 to 1981, he was editor of The Times Literary Supplement; he also served as senior book editor and critic at The New York Times. His memoir, A Double Thread, was published in 2001.

Francis Haskell (1928-2000) was an English art historian. His works include Patrons and Painters: Art and Society in Baroque Italyand History and its Images: Art and the Interpretation of the Past. Haskell taught at Oxford.

Václav Havel (1936–2011) was the last president of Czechoslovakia and the first president of the Czech Republic. Havel was one of the six signers of the statement “Tibet: The Peace of the Graveyard.”

Ted Hughes’s translation of Racine’s Phèdre will be staged at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in January and published that month. His translation of the complete Oresteia, of which the poem in this issue is the opening, will be staged by the National Theatre in England and published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in June. His last book was Birthday Letters. He died on October 28. (December 1998)

Nicholas Lemann is a Professor at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and a staff writer at The New Yorker. His books include The Big Test: The Secret History of the American Meritocracy and The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America. (June 2017)

Richard C. Lewontin is Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Biology at Harvard University. He is the author of The Genetic Basis of Evolutionary Change and Biology as Ideology, and the co-author of The Dialectical Biologist (with Richard Levins) and Not in Our Genes (with Steven Rose and Leon Kamin).

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China. He was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London and China Correspondent for The Observer.
 (December 2016)

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

Roger Shattuck (1923–2005) was an American writer and scholar of French culture. He taught at Harvard, the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Virginia, and Boston University, where he was named University Professor. His books includeForbidden Knowledge: From Prometheus to Pornography.

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Lawrence E. Walsh, formerly a federal judge in the Southern District of New York and a Deputy Attorney General of the US, has been president of the American Bar Association and was independent counsel during the Iran–contra affair. He is the author of Firewall: The Iran—Contra Conspiracy and Cover-up. (March 1998)