Contents


The Exile

Nixon in Winter by Monica Crowley

Abuse of Power: The New Nixon Tapes edited by Stanley I. Kutler

Nixon’s Economy: Booms, Busts, Dollars, and Votes by Allen J. Matusow

My Blue Heaven

Raising Baby by the Book: The Education of American Mothers by Julia Grant

Dr. Spock: An American Life by Thomas Maier

Baby and Child Care Seventh edition, by Benjamin Spock, by Steven Parker

Maybe One: A Personal and Environmental Argument for Single-Child Families by Bill McKibben

Family Man by Calvin Trillin

Born That Way: Genes, Behavior, Personality by William Wright

The War Against Parents: What We Can Do for America’s Beleaguered Moms and Dads by Sylvia Ann Hewlett, by Cornel West

Our Babies, Ourselves: How Biology and Culture Shape the Way We Parent by Meredith F. Small

Life & Death on the Social Ladder

Unhealthy Societies: The Afflictions of Inequality by Richard G. Wilkinson

Healthy Work: Stress, Productivity, and the Reconstruction of Working Life by Robert Karasek, by Töres Theorell

Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers: A Guide to Stress, Stress-Related Diseases, and Coping by Robert M. Sapolsky

The Power of Clan: The Influence of Human Relationships on Heart Disease by Stewart Wolf, by John G. Bruhn

On the Love Boat

Identity by Milan Kundera, translated by Linda Asher

The Notebooks of Don Rigoberto by Mario Vargas Llosa, translated by Edith Grossman

A Lover’s Almanac by Maureen Howard

The Red Hat by John Bayley

Child’s Play

Cymbeline of Music, June 3-6, and at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Washington, D.C., June 23-July 5, 1998 a play by William Shakespeare, directed by Adrian Noble. performed by the Royal Shakespeare Company at the Brooklyn Academy

The Way We Write Now

Without by Donald Hall

Going Fast by Frederick Seidel

Ten Commandments by J.D. McClatchy

Blizzard of One by Mark Strand

On Love by Edward Hirsch

Looking for the Sheriff

FDR and the Creation of the UN by Townsend Hoopes, by Douglas Brinkley

United Nations: The First Fifty Years by Stanley Meisler

The Reluctant Sheriff: The United States After the Cold War by Richard N. Haass

Preventing Deadly Conflict: Final Report by the Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict.

Contributors

Henry Allen is a cultural critic at The Washington Post. His new book, What It Felt Like, will be published in the fall. (March 2000)

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

Ian Buruma is the author of The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013), and Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the Shadows of War (2014), winner of the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications.

Andrew Delbanco is Levi Professor in the Humanities at Columbia. His most recent book is College: What It Was, Is, and Should Be. (July 2015)

Helen Epstein is a writer specializing in public health and an adjunct professor at Bard College. She has advised numerous organizations, including the United States Agency for International Development, the World Bank, Human Rights Watch, and UNICEF. She is the author of The Invisible Cure: Why We Are Losing the Fight Against AIDS in Africa and has contributed articles to many publications, including The New York Review of Books and The New York Times Magazine. Research for her article in the December 18, 2014 issue was supported by a grant from the Investigative Fund at 
the Nation Institute.

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. She is the author of Lulu in Marrakech 
and Le Divorce, among other novels. Her most recent book is 
Flyover Lives.


Tim Judah is a correspondent for The Economist. For The New York Review he has reported from, among other places, Afghanistan, Serbia, Uganda, and Armenia.

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His seventh collection of poetry, In a Mist, is to be published in the spring of 2015.


Joyce Carol Oates, the author of the recent novel The Sacrifice, is currently Stein Visiting Writer at Stanford.

Elaine Scarry is the author of On Beauty and Being Just and recently received the Truman Capote Prize for Dreaming by the Book. She teaches at Harvard, where she is completing a project on war and the social contract. (October 2000)

Cathleen Schine is the author of several novels, including Rameau’s Niece, The Love Letter, She is Me, The New Yorkers, and The Three Weissmanns of Westport. Her latest novel is Fin & Lady. She is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books.

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life. His article in this issue draws on his essay in Tyringham Topics.
 (February 2013)

Garry Wills holds the Alonzo L. McDonald Family Chair on the Life and Teachings of Jesus and Their Impact on Culture at Emory. He is the author of The Future of the Catholic Church with Pope Francis.

Michael Wood is the Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. His books include Literature and the Taste of Knowledge and Yeats and Violence