Contents


Journey to the End of the Night

The Endurance: Shackleton’s Legendary Antarctic Expedition by Caroline Alexander. Published in association with the American Museum of Natural History, New York, where Caroline Alexander has co-curated an exhibition that includes the James Caird and more than 150 of Frank Hurley's photographs

Shackleton by Roland Huntford

I May Be Some Time: Ice and the English Imagination by Francis Spufford

South: A Memoir of the Endurance Voyage by Ernest Shackleton

Endurance: An Epic of Polar Adventure by F.A. Worsley, with a preface by Patrick O'Brian

Shackleton’s Boat Journey by F.A. Worsley

South: Ernest Shackleton and the Endurance Expedition (1919) a film by Frank Hurley

Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing

Scott’s Last Expedition: The Journals by Robert Falcon Scott, with a new introduction by Beryl Bainbridge

Mrs. Chippy’s Last Expedition: The Remarkable Journal of Shackleton’s Polar-Bound Cat by Caroline Alexander

Plantation Blues

Runaway Slaves: Rebels on the Plantation by John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger

Rituals of Blood: Consequences of Slavery in Two American Centuries by Orlando Patterson

The Fall of The Black Empires

To Be Loved: The Music, the Magic, the Memories of Motown: An Autobiography by Berry Gordy

Berry, Me, and Motown by Raynoma Gordy Singleton

An Original Man: The Life and Times of Elijah Muhammad by Claude Andrew Clegg III

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Rosemary Dinnage’s books include The Ruffian on the Stair, One to One: Experiences of Psychotherapy, and Annie Besant.

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Václav Havel (1936–2011) was the last president of Czechoslovakia and the first president of the Czech Republic. Havel was one of the six signers of the statement “Tibet: The Peace of the Graveyard.”

Tim Judah is a correspondent for The Economist. He has ­reported for The New York Review from, among other places, ­Afghanistan, Serbia, Uganda, and Armenia.
 (May 2017)

Arthur Kempton, the author of Boogaloo: The Quintessence of American Popular Music, is a fellow at the Institute for African-American Research at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (March 2006)

Colin McGinn is a philosopher. His books include Philosophy of ­Language: The Classics Explained and Prehension: The Hand and the ­Emergence of Humanity. (June 2016)

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China. He was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London and China Correspondent for The Observer.
 (December 2016)

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

Jonathan Raban’s books include Surveillance, My Holy War, Arabia, Old Glory, Hunting Mister Heartbreak, Bad Land, Passage to Juneau, and Waxwings. His most recent book is Driving Home: An American Journey, published in 2011. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, the PEN/West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, and the Governor’s Award of the State of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, and The Independent. He lives in Seattle.

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. His latest book is Scribbled in the Dark, a volume of poetry. (November 2017)

Helen Vendler is the Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor in the Department of English at Harvard. Her latest book is The Ocean, the Bird, and the Scholar, a collection of her most recent essays. (October 2017)

Garry Wills is the subject of a Festchrift published by Northwestern’s Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Nation and World, Church and God: The Legacy of Garry Wills. (April 2017)

Warren Zimmermann, a professor of international diplomacy at Columbia University, was US Ambassador to Yugoslavia from 1989 to 1992. A revised edition of his book, Origins of a Catastrophe:Yugoslavia and Its Destroyers, has just been published in paperback. (June 1999)