Contents


Celebrities

Seabiscuit: An American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand

Wild Ride: The Rise and Tragic Fall of Calumet Farm, Inc., America’s Premier Racing Dynasty by Ann Hagedorn Auerbach

Bronze Beauties

Donatello e il suo tempo: Il bronzetto a Padova nel Quattrocento e nel Cinquecento Catalog of the exhibition edited by Davide Banzato and Gian Franco Martinoni

Liaisons Dangereuses

Positively 4th Street:The Life and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez Fariña,and Richard Fariña by David Hajdu

Down the Highway: The Life of Bob Dylan by Howard Sounes

Mr. Fixit

Maestro: Greenspan’s Fed and the American Boom Bob Woodward

Greenspan: The Man Behind Money Justin Martin

Contributors

Ian Buruma will be the new editor of The New York Review of Books in September 2017. He has been a frequent contributor to the Review since 1985. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Andrew Butterfield is President of Andrew Butterfield Fine Arts. He is the author of The Sculptures of Andrea del Verrocchio, among other books. (May 2016)

Melissa Green’s poem in this issue is drawn from the collection she has just completed, Daphne in Mourning. She is also the author of another book of poems, The Squanicook Eclogues. (July 2001)

Elizabeth Hardwick (1916–2007) was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and educated at the University of Kentucky and Columbia University. A recipient of a Gold Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she is the author of three novels, a biography of Herman Melville, and four collections of essays. She was a co-founder and advisory editor of The New York Review of Books and contributed more than one hundred reviews, articles, reflections, and letters to the magazine. NYRB Classics publishes Sleepless Nights, a novel, and Seduction and Betrayal, a study of women in literature.

Patrice Higonnet teaches French history at Harvard. His latest book is Goodness Beyond Virtue: Jacobins During the French Revolution. (July 2001)

Michael Ignatieff is President of Central European University in Budapest. His books include Isaiah Berlin: A Life and The Lesser Evil: Political Ethics in an Age of Terror.
 (April 2017)

Stephen Kinzer, a former New York Times bureau chief in Nica­ragua, is a visiting fellow at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown. His new book is The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War. (December 2013)

John Leonard writes on books every month for Harper’s and on television every week for New York magazine. (June 2007)

Richard C. Lewontin is Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Biology at Harvard University. He is the author of The Genetic Basis of Evolutionary Change and Biology as Ideology, and the co-author of The Dialectical Biologist (with Richard Levins) and Not in Our Genes (with Steven Rose and Leon Kamin).

Jeff Madrick is the Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative at the Century Foundation and Editor of Challenge. His most recent book is Seven Bad Ideas: How Mainstream Economists Damaged America and the World.
 (June 2017)

Hilary Mantel is an English novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her novel, Wolf Hall, won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

Hayden Pelliccia is a Professor of Classics at Cornell. (October 2017)

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. His new book, Scribbled in the Dark, a volume of poetry, will be published in June.
 (June 2017)