Contents


In the Midst of Losses

Paul Celan: Poet, Survivor, Jew by John Felstiner

Selected Poems and Prose of Paul Celan translated from the German by John Felstiner

Glottal Stop: 101 Poems by Paul Celan, translated from the German by Nikolai Popov and Heather McHugh

Breathturn by Paul Celan, translated from the German by Pierre Joris

Threadsuns by Paul Celan, translated from the German by Pierre Joris

Etruscan Secrets

Gli Etruschi (The Etruscans)

The Etruscans edited by Mario Torelli, translated from the Italian by Rhoda Billingsley et al.

Etruscan Civilization: A Cultural History by Sybille Haynes

Some Like It Hot

Climate Change 2001:Third Assessment Report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

National Energy Policy: Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group Dick Cheney, Colin L. Powell, Paul O'Neill, Gale Norton (Secretary of the Interior), Ann M. Veneman (Secretary of Agriculture), Donald L. Evans (Secretary of Commerce), Norman Y. Mineta (Secretary of Transportation), Spencer Abraham (Secretary of Energy),

The Japanese Malaise

Dogs and Demons: Tales from the Dark Side of Japan by Alex Kerr

Underground: The Tokyo Gas Attack and the Japanese Psyche by Haruki Murakami, translated from the Japanese by Alfred Birnbaum and Philip Gabriel

Scenes from a Marriage

Within Four Walls: The Correspondence between Hannah Arendt and Heinrich Blücher, 1936–1968 edited and with an introduction by Lotte Kohler, translated from the German by Peter Constantine

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written over seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty. His ­memoir, A Tokyo Romance, has just been published. (April 2018)

J.M. Coetzee is Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide. He is the author of sixteen works of fiction, as well as numerous works of criticism and translation. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003. His story in this issue is adapted from Moral Tales, a forthcoming collection. (December 2017)

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

Eamon Duffy is Emeritus Professor of the History of ­Christianity at the University of Cambridge. His latest book is ­Reformation Divided: Catholics, Protestants and the Conversion of England. (February 2018)

Amos Elon (1926–2009) was an Israeli journalist. His final book was The Pity of It All: A Portrait of Jews In Germany 1743 – 1933.

Jason Epstein, former Editorial Director at Random House, was a founder of The New York Review and of the Library of America. He is the author of Eating: A Memoir. (Dectember 2013)

Helen Epstein teaches at Bard and is the author, most recently, of Another Fine Mess: America, Uganda, and the War on Terror. (June 2018)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: ­Poems, 1968–2011. (July 2018)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Frank Kermode (1919–2010) was a British critic and literary theorist. Born on the Isle of Man, he taught at University College London, Cambridge, Columbia and Harvard. Adapted from a series of lectures given at Bryn Mawr College, Kermode’s Sense of An Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction remains one of the most influential works of twentieth-century literary criticism.

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Masha Lipman is the former Deputy Editor of the Russian news magazine Itogi. (May 2001)

David Lodge is a novelist and critic and Emeritus Professor of English Literature at the University of Birmingham, England. His novels include Changing Places, Small World, Nice Work, and A Man of Parts. His most recent works of criticism are Consciousness and the Novel and The Year of Henry James.

Bill McKibben is the founder of 350.org, the Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury, and the author, most recently, of Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist. (February 2017)

Ingrid D. Rowland is a Professor at the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway. Her latest book is The Collector of Lives: Giorgio ­Vasari and the Invention of Art, cowritten with Noah Charney.
 (June 2018)

Alan Ryan is the author of On Tocqueville, On Marx, and the two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought from Herodotus to the Present. 
(January 2018)