Contents


The Bishops at Bay

Betrayal: The Crisis in the Catholic Church by the Investigative Staff of the Boston Globe

Conclave: The Politics, Personalities, and Process of the Next Papal Election by John L. Allen Jr.

Gardening with Attitude

We Made a Garden by Margery Fish,with a foreword by Graham Stuart Thomas

Green Thoughts: A Writer in the Garden by Eleanor Perényi, with an introduction by Allen Lacey

The Gardener’s Year by Karel Capek, with an introduction by Verlyn Klinkenborg

My Summer in a Garden by Charles Dudley Warner, with an introduction by Allan Gurganus

The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World by Michael Pollan

An Island Garden by Celia Thaxter, illustrated by Childe Hassam, with an introduction by Tasha Tudor

Murder in India

‘We Have No Orders to Save You’: State Participation and Complicity in Communal Violence in Gujarat a report by Human Rights Watch

He Took Manhattan

Somewhere for Me: A Biography of Richard Rodgers by Meryle Secrest

Lorenz Hart: A Poet on Broadway by Frederick Nolan

Making a Fetish of Mystery

Essay on Exoticism: An Aesthetics of Diversity by Victor Segalen, translated and edited by Yaël Rachel Schlick, with a foreword by Harry Harootunian

Contributors

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (October 2017)

Benjamin M. Friedman is the William Joseph Maier Professor of Political Economy at Harvard and the author of The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth.

 He is currently finishing a book on the historical influence of religious thinking on economic thinking.(October 2017)

David Hajdu, author of Lush Life and Positively 4th Street, teaches at Syracuse University and is music critic for The New Republic. (June 2005)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Kenneth Koch (1925–2002) was Professor of English at Columbia. During his lifetime, Koch published at least thirty volumes of poetry and plays. He was also the author of a novel, The Red Robins; two books on teaching poetry writing to children, Wishes, Lies, and Dreams and Rose, Where Did You Get That Red?; and I Never Told Anybody: Teaching Poetry Writing in a Nursing Home.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Joyce Carol Oates’s Beautiful Days, a collection of stories, will be published in February. She is currently Distinguished Writer in Residence in the Graduate Program at NYU. (December 2017)

Darryl Pinckney’s most recent book is a novel, Black Deutschland. (November 2017)

Sanford Schwartz is the author of Christen Købke and William Nicholson. (October 2017)

Saul Steinberg died in 1999. Collections of his drawings include All in Line, The Passport, The Labyrinth, The Inspector, and The Discovery of America. The article in this issue is drawn from Reflections and Shadows, a book of interviews with the writer Aldo Buzzi, just published by Random House. (August 2002)

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Garry Wills is the subject of a Festschrift published by Northwestern’s Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Nation and World, Church and God: The Legacy of Garry Wills. (April 2017)