Contents


Missionaries

The Steins Collect: Matisse, Picasso, and the Parisian Avant-Garde an exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, May 21–September 6, 2011; The Grand Palais, Paris, October 3, 2011–January 16, 2012; and Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, February 28–June 3, 2012

Unlikely Collaboration: Gertrude Stein, Bernard Fäy, and the Vichy Dilemma by Barbara Will

Ida: A Novel by Gertrude Stein, edited by Logan Esdale

A Life for the Star

The Accidental Feminist: How Elizabeth Taylor Raised Our Consciousness and We Were Too Distracted by Her Beauty to Notice by M.G. Lord

‘The Paralysis of Stuttering’

Stuttering: An Integrated Approach to Its Nature and Treatment by Barry Guitar

Stuttering: The Disorder of Many Theories by Gerald Jonas

Black Swan Green by David Mitchell

Dead Languages by David Shields

The King’s Speech: How One Man Saved the British Monarchy by Mark Logue and Peter Conradi

Foundations of Stuttering by Marcel E. Wingate

Stutter by Marc Shell

Contributors

Anne Applebaum is a columnist for The Washington Post and a Professor of Practice at the London School of Economics’ Institute of Global Affairs. Her new book, Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine, will be published in October. (October 2017)

Antony Beevor is a visiting professor at the University of Kent. His latest book is Ardennes 1944: The Battle of the Bulge.
 (March 2017)

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay.
 (April 2017)

David Bromwich is Sterling Professor of English at Yale. Moral Imagination, a collection of his essays, was recently published in paperback. (October 2017)

J.M. Coetzee is Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide. He is the author of sixteen works of fiction, as well as many works of criticism and translation. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003.
 (January 2017)

Joel E. Cohen is Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor of ­Populations at the Rockefeller University and Columbia University and the author of How Many People Can the Earth Support?
 (April 2014)

Samuel Freeman is the Avalon Professor in the Humanities and Professor of Philosophy and of Law at the University of Pennsylvania. His book Liberalism, Economic Justice, and the Difference Principle, a collection of recent essays, will be published next year. (March 2017)

Joshua Hammer is a former Newsweek Bureau Chief and Correspondent-­at-Large in Africa and the Middle East. His most recent book is The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu and Their Race to Save the World’s Most Precious Manuscripts. (June 2017)

Ian Johnson reports from Beijing and Berlin. His new book, The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, was published in April. He received the 2016 Shorenstein Journalism Award. (October 2017)

Michael Kimmelman is a longtime critic for The New York Times. A version of his essay in this issue will appear in the collection City Squares: Eighteen Writers on the Spirit and Significance of Squares Around the World, edited by Catie Marron and published in April by Harper.
 (April 2016)

Joseph Lelyveld’s most recent book is His Final Battle: The Last Months of Franklin Roosevelt. (November 2017)

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

William D. Nordhaus is Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale. He has written extensively on economic growth, including studies of the economic impacts of lighting, computation, and improved health. (August 2016)

Thomas Powers’s books include The Confirmation, a novel, and The Killing of Crazy Horse. (April 2017)

Jonathan Raban’s books include Surveillance, My Holy War, Arabia, Old Glory, Hunting Mister Heartbreak, Bad Land, Passage to Juneau, and Waxwings. His most recent book is Driving Home: An American Journey, published in 2011. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, the PEN/West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, and the Governor’s Award of the State of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, and The Independent. He lives in Seattle.

Stanley Wells is Honorary President of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and an Honorary Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. His two new books, Great Shakespeare Actors: From Burbage to Branagh and William Shakespeare: A Very Short Introduction, are to be published in June and September of this year. (March 2015)

Christopher de Bellaigue’s most recent book is The Islamic Enlightenment: The Struggle Between Faith and Reason, 1798 to Modern Times. (July 2017)

Francine du Plessix Gray received the National Book Critics Circle Award in 2006 for her memoir Them: A Memoir of Parents.

Marie d’Origny is Deputy Director of the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at The New York Public Library.
 (April 2012)