Contents


Simply Himself

Fernand Léger Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, May 29-September 29, 1997; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, October 28, 1997-January 12, 1998; Museum of Modern Art, New York, February 15-May 12, 1998. a retrospective exhibition at the Musée National d'Art Moderne,, Catalog of the New York exhibition by Carolyn Lanchner, with Jodi Hauptman and Matthew Affron

Strand’s Great Moment

Paul Strand circa 1916 1998, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, June 19-September 15, 1998. an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, March 10-May 31,, Catalog of the exhibition by Maria Morris Hambourg

Victoria’s Secrets

Other Powers: The Age of Suffrage, Spiritualism, and the Scandalous Victoria Woodhull by Barbara Goldsmith

Notorious Victoria by Mary Gabriel

Comparatively Speaking

The Comparative Imagination: On the History of Racism, Nationalism, and Social Movements by George M. Fredrickson

Black Liberation: A Comparative History of Black Ideologies in the United States and South Africa by George M. Fredrickson

Comrades in Business: Post-Liberation Politics in South Africa by Heribert Adam and Frederik Van Zyl Slabbert and Kogila Moodley

Contributors

Henry Allen is a cultural critic at The Washington Post. His new book, What It Felt Like, will be published in the fall. (March 2000)

Neal Ascherson is the author of Black Sea, Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland, and the novel Death of the Fronsac. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.
 (April 2019)

Millicent Bell is Professor of English Emerita at Boston University. She is the author of Meaning in Henry James and the editor of The Cambridge Companion to Edith Wharton. (May 1998)

Isaiah Berlin (1909–1997) was a philosopher and historian of ideas who held the Chichele Professorship of Social and Political Theory at Oxford. The final volume of his correspondence, Affirming: Letters 1975–1997, was published in December 2015.

J.M. Coetzee is Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide. He is the author of seventeen works of fiction, as well as ­numerous works of criticism and translation. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003. (September 2019)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (May 2019)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. His books include The Polish Revolution: Solidarity and The Magic Lantern: The Revolution of ’89 Witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin, and Prague.
 (August 2018)

John Golding (1929–2012) was a British painter and art historian. He taught at the Courtauld Institute and the Royal College of Art. Among his many books was Cubism: A History and an Analysis, which refuted the notion that Cubism represented a break with the realist tradition. Golding also curated exhibitions on both sides of the Atlantic, including Picasso: Painter/Sculpter and Matisse Picasso.

Tim Judah is currently a Fellow at the Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen in Vienna. He has reported for The New York Review from, among other places, ­Afghanistan, Serbia, Uganda, and Armenia.
 (October 2018)

Kenneth Koch (1925–2002) was Professor of English at Columbia. During his lifetime, Koch published at least thirty volumes of poetry and plays. He was also the author of a novel, The Red Robins; two books on teaching poetry writing to children, Wishes, Lies, and Dreams and Rose, Where Did You Get That Red?; and I Never Told Anybody: Teaching Poetry Writing in a Nursing Home.

Mark Lilla is Professor of Humanities at Columbia. He is the author of The Shipwrecked Mind: On Political Reaction and, most recently, The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics.
 Visit marklilla.com. (December 2018)

Kenneth Maxwell , the founder of the Brazil Studies Program at 
Harvard’s David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, is currently 
a weekly columnist for the Brazilian newspaper Folha de São Paulo.
 (August 2015)

Charles Rosen was a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Leonard Thompson is Charles J. Stillé Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His books include The Political Mythology of Apartheid and A History of South Africa. (May 1998)