Jerome Groopman is the Recanati Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chief of Experimental Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He has published more than 180 scientific articles and is a staff writer at The New Yorker and, most recently, the coauthor with ­Pamela Hartzband of Your Medical Mind: How to Decide What Is Right for You.
 (March 2016)


Cancer: A Time for Skeptics

Robert Pope: Radiation, 1989

The Death of Cancer

by Vincent T. DeVita Jr. and Elizabeth DeVita-Raeburn
The progress over the past forty-five years in combating cancer arose largely from challenging authority and rejecting conventional thinking.

A Doctor’s Body Language

Jack Nicholson in One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, 1975

Adventures in Human Being: A Grand Tour from the Cranium to the Calcaneum

by Gavin Francis
It was the first day of medical school, and I was about to dissect the corpse of a middle-aged woman. Like all the cadavers in the anatomy lab, her head, hands, and feet were covered by gauze. The instructor pointed to an exposed arm and showed me how to cut …

The Victory of Oliver Sacks

Oliver Sacks, New York City, 2000

On the Move: A Life

by Oliver Sacks
Oliver Sacks inspired my efforts as a physician-writer, as he has for so many others. I am, in a sense, one of his students. Now, in settings like my seminar, his work inspires the next generation to think and create. His writing, like the light from a distant star, will continue to illuminate the lives of his readers, long after its source is extinguished.

There’s No Way Out of It!

Peter Paul Rubens: Achilles Dipped into the River Styx, circa 1630–1635

On Immunity: An Inoculation

by Eula Biss

Bad Faith: When Religious Belief Undermines Modern Medicine

by Paul A. Offit, M.D.
My mother and father feared debility and death due to pathogens. They were raised in immigrant New York neighborhoods at a time when diphtheria, typhoid, and tuberculosis were rife. The idea of preventing or curing dreaded infectious diseases “naturally,” relying on the body alone, hardly entered our minds. But two generations later, such ideas have considerable traction in our society.

When Doctors Admit They Went Wrong

Terrence Holt, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 2009

Internal Medicine: A Doctor’s Stories

by Terrence Holt
On a sultry June morning in 1976, wearing a starched white coat and tightly knotted tie, I entered the Massachusetts General Hospital. It was my first day of internship, the moment when I would become a real doctor after four years of medical school. I had been a driven student, …

How Memory Speaks

Roy Lichtenstein: The Melody Haunts My Reverie, 1965

I Forgot to Remember: A Memoir of Amnesia

by Su Meck, with Daniel de Visé

Memory: From Mind to Molecules

by Larry R. Squire and Eric R. Kandel
I began writing these words on what appeared to be an unremarkable Sunday morning. Shortly before sunrise, the bedroom still dim, I awoke and quietly made my way to the kitchen, careful not to disturb my still-sleeping wife. The dark-roast coffee was retrieved from its place in the pantry, four scoops then placed in a filter. While the coffee was brewing, I picked up The New York Times at the door. Scanning the front page, my eyes rested on an article mentioning Svoboda, the far-right Ukrainian political party (svoboda, means, I remembered, “freedom”). I prepared an egg-white omelette and toasted two slices of multigrain bread. After a few sips of coffee, fragments of the night’s dream came to mind…