Contents


A Somber Theater

The Love-Girl and the Innocent by Alexander Solzhenitsyn, translated by Nicholas Bethell, translated by David Burg

Five Plays of Alexander Ostrovsky translated and edited by Eugene K. Bristow

The Trilogy of Alexander Sukhovo-Kobylin translated by Harold B. Segel

The Complete Plays of Vladimir Mayakovsky translated by Guy Daniels

The Blind Beauty by Boris Pasternak, translated by Manya Harari, translated by Max Hayward

Meyerhold on Theatre translated and edited by Edward Braun

Notes of a Director by Alexander Tairov, translated by William Kuhlke

Germanics

Rosshalde by Hermann Hesse, translated by Ralph Manheim

Children Are Civilians Too by Heinrich Böll, translated by Leila Vennewitz

Bodies and Shadows by Peter Weiss, translated by E.B. Garside, translated by Rosemarie Waldrop

Below the Boot

A History of Sicily: Ancient Sicily to the Arab Conquest by M.I. Finley

Medieval Sicily: 800-1713 and Medieval Sicily: After 1713 by Denis Mack Smith

Contributors

D.J. Enright (1920–2002) was a British poet, novelist and critic. He held teaching positions in Egypt, Japan, Thailand, Singapore and the United Kingdom. In 1981 Enright was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Frances FitzGerald’s books include Fire in the Lake: The Vietnamese and the Americans in Vietnam and, most recently, The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America. (November 2017)

Paul Goodman (1911–1972) was an American social critic, psychologist, poet, novelist, and anarchist. His writings appeared in Politics, Partisan Review, The New Republic, Commentary, The New Leader, Dissent, and The New York Review of Books. He published several well-regarded books in a variety of fields—including city planning, Gestalt therapy, literary criticism, and politics—before Growing Up Absurd, cancelled by its original publisher and turned down by a number of other presses, was brought out by Random House in 1960.

Alberto Moravia (1907–1990) was one of Italy’s greatest twentieth-century writers. Among his best-known books to have appeared in English are Boredom, The Woman of Rome, The Conformist (the basis for Bernardo Bertolucci’s film), Roman Tales, Contempt (the basis for Jean-Luc Godard’s film), and Two Women.

Jack Richardson (1934–2012) was a playwright, novelist and drama critic. His 1960 play, The Prodigal, a retelling of Euripides’ Orestes, won an Obie Award and a Drama Desk Award. Richardson wrote dramatic criticism for The New York Times, Esquire and Commentary and was a frequent contributor to The Review.

Jean-Paul Sartre (1905–1980) was a hugely influential French philosopher, novelist, playwright, and pamphleteer. In 1964 he declined the Nobel Prize for Literature. Among his most well-known works available in English are Nausea, Being and Nothingness, No Exit, Critique of Dialectical Reason, and The Words.

Edmund Wilson (1895-1972) is widely regarded as the preeminent American man of letters of the twentieth century. Over his long career, he wrote for Vanity Fair, helped edit The New Republic, served as chief book critic for The New Yorker, and was a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books. Wilson was the author of more than twenty books, including Axel’s Castle, Patriotic Gore, and a work of fiction, Memoirs of Hecate County.