Contents


Secrets of the Mormons

America’s Saints: The Rise of Mormon Power by Robert Gottlieb, by Peter Wiley

Mormonism: The Story of A New Religious Tradition by Jan Shipps

Joseph Smith and the Beginnings of Mormonism by Richard L. Bushman

Brigham Young: American Moses by Leonard J. Arrington

The Prospects of Nuclear War

Hawks, Doves, and Owls: An Agenda for Avoiding Nuclear War edited by Graham T. Allison, edited by Albert Carnesale, edited by Joseph S. Nye Jr.

The Button: The Pentagon’s Strategic Command and Control System by Daniel Ford

Moveable Types

Small World: An Academic Romance by David Lodge

Later the Same Day by Grace Paley

Self-Help by Lorrie Moore

Wagner Goes West

Der Ring des Nibelungen by Richard Wagner. produced by the San Francisco Opera, June 1985

Die Walküre, Siegfried, Götterdämmerung by Nicholas John

Contributors

Noel Annan (1916–2000) was a British military intelligence officer and scholar of European history. His works include Leslie Stephen and Our Age, Changing Enemies: The Defeat and Regeneration of Germany, and The Curious Strength of Positivism in English Political Thought.

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

Jorge Luis Borges (1899–1986), a giant in Latin American letters, wrote numerous books of poetry, fiction, and essays, and was a prodigious translator of authors such as Kipling, Woolf, Faulkner, and Poe. He was a regular contributor to Victoria Ocampo’s journal Sur, and a frequent dinner guest of Silvina Ocampo and Bioy Casares. Over one of their legendary conversations, the three friends came upon the idea of editing the Antología de la Literatura Fantástica, which was published in 1940.

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

Theodore H. Draper (1912–2006) was an American historian. Educated at City College, he wrote influential studies of the American Communist Party, the Cuban Revolution and the Iran-Contra Affair. Draper was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 1990 recipient of the Herbert Feis Award from the American Historical Association.

Jonathan Galassi is a translator of Eugenio Montale and Giacomo Leopardi. His most recent collection of poems is Left-Handed, and his novel, Muse, will be published next spring.
 (June 2014)

Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002) was an American geologist, biologist and historian of science. He taught at Harvard, where he was named Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology, and at NYU. His last book was Punctuated Equilibrium.

E. D. Hirsch Jr. is the founder and chairman of the Core Knowledge Foundation and professor emeritus of education and humanities at the University of Virginia. He is the author, most recently, of The Making of Americans: Democracy and Our Schools. (May 2010)

Joseph Kerman is emeritus professor of music at the University of California, Berkeley. He began writing music criticism for The Hudson Review in the 1950s, and is a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books and many other journals. His books include Opera as Drama (1956; new and revised edition 1988), The Beethoven Quartets (1967), Contemplating Music (1986), Concerto Conversations (1999), and The Art of Fugue (2005).

Bernard Lewis is Cleveland E. Dodge Professor of Near Eastern Studies Emeritus at Princeton. His most recent books are Music of a Distant Drum and What Went Wrong: Western Impact and Middle Eastern Response. (May 2002)

Eugenio Montale was born in Genoa in 1896 and died in 1981. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1975. (November 2004)

Oliver Sacks is a physician and the author of ten books, the most recent of which is Hallucinations. He is a professor of ­neurology at NYU School of Medicine and a visiting professor at the University of Warwick.


Robert Towers (1923–1995) was an American critic and novelist. Born in Virginia, Towers was educated at Princeton and served for two years as Vice Counsel at the American Consulate General in Calcutta before dedicating himself to literary studies. He taught English literature and creative writing at Princeton, Queens College and Columbia.

Lord Zuckerman (1904–1993) was a British zoologist and military strategist. Having advised the Allies on bombing strategy during World War II, he spent much of his later life campaigning for nuclear non-proliferation. Zuckerman was knighted in 1956 and made a life peer in 1971.