Race and History: Selected Essays, 1938–1988 by John Hope Franklin

The Color Line: Legacy for the Twenty-First Century by John Hope Franklin

The Facts of Reconstruction: Essays in Honor of John Hope Franklin edited by Eric Anderson, edited by Alfred A. Moss Jr.

Unlikely Hero

Hope Dies Last: The Autobiography of Alexander Dubcek edited and translated by Jirí Hochman

The Heroism of Despair

Selected Letters by Henry Adams, edited by Ernest Samuels

Authority and Alliance in the Letters of Henry Adams by Joanne Jacobson

The Correspondence of Henry James and Henry Adams 1877–-1914 edited by George Monteiro

Refinements of Love: A Novel about Clover and Henry Adams by Sarah Booth Conroy


John Ashbery’s new book of poems, Commotion of the Birds, will be published in November. (August 2016)

Robert Conquest, a Fellow of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, is the author of The Great Terror. (March 1997)

Denis Donoghue is Emeritus University Professor of English and American Letters at NYU. (April 2016)

George M. Fredrickson is Edgar E. Robinson Professor of US History Emeritus at Stanford. His recent books include Racism: A Short History and Not Just Black and White, a collection co-edited with Nancy Foner.

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. She is the author of Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce, among other novels, and a memoir, Flyover Lives.
 (October 2017)

Hilary Mantel is an English novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her novel, Wolf Hall, won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

Aryeh Neier is President Emeritus of the Open Society Foundations. His most recent book is The International Human Rights Movement: A History. (February 2018)

M. F. Perutz (1914–2002) was an Austrian molecular biologist. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1962. He is the author of Is Science Necessary?, Protein Structure, and I Wish I’d Made You Angry Earlier.

Sheila M. Rothman is Professor of Public Health at the Mailman School, Columbia University. Their books written together include The Willowbrook Wars: A Decade of Struggle for Social Justice (1984) and The Pursuit of Perfection: The Promise and Perils of Medical Enhancement (2003).

David J. Rothman is Bernard Schoenberg Professor of Social Medicine and History at the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons and president of the Institute on Medicine as a Professor.

Alan Ryan is the author of On Tocqueville, On Marx, and the two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought from Herodotus to the Present. 
(January 2018)

Jonathan Spence is Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. Among his books are The Death of Woman Wang, Treason by the Book, The Question of Hu, and The Search for Modern China.

Ronald Steel is Professor of International Relations at the University of Southern California, a recent fellow at the American Academy in Berlin, and the author of biographies of Walter Lippmann and Robert Kennedy.

Robert Stone was born in Brooklyn in 1937. He is the author of seven novels: A Hall of Mirrors, the National Book Award–winning Dog Soldiers, A Flag for Sunrise, Children of Light, Outerbridge Reach, Damascus Gate, and Bay of Souls. He has also written short stories, essays, and screenplays, and published a short story collection, Bear and His Daughter, which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. He lives in New York City and in Key West, Florida.

John Terborgh, who has worked in the Peruvian Amazon since 1973, is Research Professor in the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke and Director of its Center for Tropical Conservation. His latest book, co-edited with James A. Estes, is Trophic Cascades: Predators, Prey, and the Changing Dynamics of Nature.
 (April 2012)

John Weightman (1915–2004) was a critic and literary scholar. After working as a translator and announcer for the BBC French service, Weightman turned to the study of French literature. He taught at King’s College London and the University of London. His books include The Concept of the Avant-Gardeand The Cat Sat on the Mat: Language and the Absurd.

Garry Wills is the subject of a Festschrift published by Northwestern’s Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Nation and World, Church and God: The Legacy of Garry Wills. His latest book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters. (February 2018)

Paul Wilson’s translation of Bohumil Hrabal’s early stories, Mr. Kafka and Other Tales from the Time of the Cult, is published this month. (November 2015)