Contents


The Great Art of Embarrassment

Writing Home by Alan Bennett

The Madness of King George III a film directed by Nicholas Hytner. screenplay by Alan Bennett, based on his play The Madness of George III

The Madness of George III by Alan Bennett

Rags!

Fashioning the Bourgeoisie: A History of Clothing in the Nineteenth Century by Philippe Perrot, translated by Richard Bienvenu

Sex and Suits by Anne Hollander

The Afghan Amulet: Travels from the Hindu Kush to Razgrad by Sheila Paine

Fashion, Culture, and Identity by Fred Davis

The Empire of Fashion: Dressing Modern Democracy by Gilles Lipovetsky, translated by Catherine Porter, foreword by Richard Sennett

‘The Seated Sublime’

Italian Renaissance Architecture: Brunelleschi, Sangallo, Michelangelo
The Cathedrals of Florence and Pavia, and St. Peter’s, Rome 1994 The National Gallery, Washington, DC, December 18, 1994–March 19, 1995
an exhibition at the Palazzo Grassi, Venice, April 1–November 6,

The Renaissance from Brunelleschi to Michelangelo: The Representation of Architecture edited by Henry A. Millon, edited by Vittorio Magnago Lampugnani

The Architectural Drawings of Antonio da Sangallo the Younger and His Circle Vol. 1: Fortifications, Machines, and Festival Architecture edited by Christoph L. Frommel, edited by Nicholas Adams

San Pietro. Un progetto e un modello. Storia e restauro. Santa Maria del Fiore. Quattro modelli per il tamburo della cupola edited by Pier Luigi Silvan

Michelangelo at San Lorenzo: The Genius as Entrepreneur by William E. Wallace

Michelangelo Architect by Giulio Carlo Argan and Bruno Contardi, translated by Marion L. Grayson

Leon Battista Alberti 10–December 11, 1994 catalog of the exhibition at the Palazzo del Te, Mantua, September, edited by Joseph Rykwert, edited by Anne Engel

Contributors

Anne Barton is a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. She is the author of Essays, Mainly Shakespearean.

Alfred Brendel is a pianist and the author of several books of essays and poetry, most recently Music, Sense and Nonsense: Collected ­Essays and Lectures.
 (October 2016)

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Joseph Connors, the Director of the Harvard Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, Villa I Tatti, Florence, writes on Italian Renaissance and Baroque architecture. He was formerly Director of the American Academy in Rome and professor of art history at Columbia.

Robert Hughes (1938–2012) was an art critic and television writer. In the award-winning documentary series, The Shock of The New, Hughes recounted the development of modern art since the Impressionists; in The Fatal Shore, he explored the history of his native Australia. Hughes’s memoir, Things I Didn’t Know, was published in 2006.

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. She is the author of Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce, among other novels, and a memoir, Flyover Lives.
 (October 2017)

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Frank Kermode (1919–2010) was a British critic and literary theorist. Born on the Isle of Man, he taught at University College London, Cambridge, Columbia and Harvard. Adapted from a series of lectures given at Bryn Mawr College, Kermode’s Sense of An Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction remains one of the most influential works of twentieth-century literary criticism.

Bernard Knox (1914–2010) was an English classicist. He was the first director of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Among his many books are The Heroic Temper, The Oldest Dead White European Males, and Backing into the Future: The Classical Tradition and Its Renewal. He is the editor of The Norton Book of Classical Literature and wrote the introductions and notes for Robert Fagles’s translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Hilary Mantel is an English novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her novel, Wolf Hall, won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

Jack F. Matlock Jr. is Rubenstein Fellow at Duke. He is the ­author of Autopsy on an Empire, Reagan and Gorbachev: How the Cold War Ended, and Superpower Illusions. Between 1987 and 1991 he was US ­Ambassador to the Soviet Union. (June 2016)

Alan Ryan’s On Tocqueville and On Marx were published last year. He is the author of the two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought: From Herodotus to the Present. He is visiting professor of philosophy at Stanford.