Contents


Dangerous Women

The Brontës by Juliet Barker

Charlotte Brontë: A Passionate Life by Lyndall Gordon

The Letters of Charlotte Brontë edited by Margaret Smith

Impressionists on Stage

Landscapes of France: Impressionism and its Rivals 1995 an exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, London, May 18 to August 28,

Impressions of France: Monet, Renoir, Pissarro, and their Rivals October 4, 1995 to January 14, 1996. the same exhibition, retitled, at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston,, Catalog of the exhibitions by John House, with contributions from Ann Dumas, by Jane Mayo Roos, by James F. McMillan

Claude Monet 1840–1926 26, 1995 an exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, July 22 to November, Catalog of the exhibition by Charles F. Stuckey, with the assistance of Sophia Shaw

Monet to Matisse: Landscape Painting in France 1874–1914 Edinburgh an exhibition held in 1994 at the National Gallery of Scotland,, Catalog of the exhibition by Richard Thomson, with an essay by Michael Clarke

The Mystery of Consciousness

The Astonishing Hypothesis: The Scientific Search for the Soul by Francis Crick

Consciousness Explained by Daniel C. Dennett

The Remembered Present: A Biological Theory of Consciousness by Gerald Edelman

Bright Air, Brilliant Fire: On the Matter of the Mind by Gerald Edelman

Shadows of the Mind: A Search for the Missing Science of Consciousness by Roger Penrose

The Strange, Familiar, and Forgotten: An Anatomy of Consciousness by Israel Rosenfield

Contributors

Millicent Bell is Professor of English Emerita at Boston University. She is the author of Meaning in Henry James and the editor of The Cambridge Companion to Edith Wharton. (May 1998)

Robert Craft is a conductor and writer. Craft’s close working friendship with Igor Stravinsky is the subject of his memoir, An Improbable Life. In 2002 he was awarded the International Prix du Disque at the Cannes Music Festival.

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

Theodore H. Draper (1912–2006) was an American historian. Educated at City College, he wrote influential studies of the American Communist Party, the Cuban Revolution and the Iran-Contra Affair. Draper was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 1990 recipient of the Herbert Feis Award from the American Historical Association.

John Gross (1935–2011) was an English editor and critic. From 1974 to 1981, he was editor of The Times Literary Supplement; he also served as senior book editor and critic at The New York Times. His memoir, A Double Thread, was published in 2001.

Robert L. Herbert, after a long career at Yale, is now Andrew W. Mellon Professor Emeritus of Humanities at Mount Holyoke. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, and has been named Officier dans l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Government. Among his books are Impressionism: Art, Leisure and Parisian Society, Nature’s Workshop: Renoir’s Writings on the Decorative Arts, and Seurat: Drawings and Paintings. His most recent book is Seurat and the Making of La Grande Jatte.

Stanley Hoffmann is Paul and Catherine Buttenwieser University Professor at Harvard. His most recent books are Chaos and Violence: What Globalization, Failed States, and Terrorism Mean for US Foreign Policy and Rousseau and Freedom, coedited with Christie McDonald.


Richard Horton is a physician. He edits The Lancet, a weekly medical journal based in London and New York. He is also a visiting professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Michael Ignatieff is the Edward R. Murrow Professor of Practice at the Harvard Kennedy School and the author of Fire and Ashes: Success and Failure in Politics. The article in this issue draws on the Ditchley Foundation Annual Lecture, which he gave in July. (September 2014)

Richard C. Lewontin is Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Biology at Harvard University. He is the author of The Genetic Basis of Evolutionary Change and Biology as Ideology, and the co-author of The Dialectical Biologist (with Richard Levins) and Not in Our Genes (with Steven Rose and Leon Kamin).

Fiona Maccarthy is the author of biographies of Eric Gill, William Morris, and Lord Byron. Her most recent book, The Last Pre-Raphaelite: Edward Burne-Jones and the Victorian Imagination, was published last year. (April 2013)

Thomas Powers is the author of The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA (1979), Heisenberg’s War: The Secret History of the German Bomb (1993), Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda (2002; revised and expanded edition, 2004), and The Confirmation (2000), a novel. He won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1971 and has contributed to The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, The Nation, The Atlantic, and Rolling Stone. His latest book, The Killing of Crazy Horse, won the 2011 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History. He is currently writing a memoir of his father, who once told him that the last time he met Clare Boothe Luce was in the office of Allen Dulles.


Michael Scammell, the author of biographies of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and Arthur Koestler, is working on a new translation of Crime and Punishment. (July 2014)

John R. Searle is the Slusser Professor of Philosophy at 
the University of California, Berkeley. His most recent book is ­Making the Social World.
 (October 2014)

Robert Stone was born in Brooklyn in 1937. He is the author of seven novels: A Hall of Mirrors, the National Book Award–winning Dog Soldiers, A Flag for Sunrise, Children of Light, Outerbridge Reach, Damascus Gate, and Bay of Souls. He has also written short stories, essays, and screenplays, and published a short story collection, Bear and His Daughter, which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. He lives in New York City and in Key West, Florida.

Gore Vidal (1925–2012) was an American novelist, essayist, and playwright. His many works include the memoirs Point to Point Navigation and Palimpsest, the novels The City and the Pillar, Myra Breckinridge, and Lincoln, and the collection United States: Essays 1952–1992.