Contents


The War Over The Bomb

The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb and the Architecture of an American Myth by Gar Alperovitz, by Sanho Tree, by Edward Rouse Winstead, by Kathryn C. Morris, by David J. Williams, by Leo C. Maley III, by Thad Williamson, by Miranda Grieder

Writing Ground Zero: Japanese Literature and the Atomic Bomb by John Whittier Treat

Judgment at the Smithsonian: The Uncensored Script of the Smithsonian’s 50th Anniversary Exhibit of the Enola Gay edited and introduced by Philip Nobile, afterword by Barton J. Bernstein

Hiroshima in America: Fifty Years of Denial by Robert Jay Lifton, by Greg Mitchell

Code-Name Downfall: The Secret Plan to Invade Japan—And Why Truman Dropped the Bomb by Thomas B. Allen, by Norman Polmar

Nagasaki Journey: The Photographs of Yosuke Yamahata, August 10, 1945 edited by Rupert Jenkins

The Constant Wife

D.H. Lawrence: The Story of a Marriage by Brenda Maddox

A Genius for Living: The Life of Frieda Lawrence by Janet Byrne

Frieda Lawrence, Including ‘Not I, But the Wind’ and other autobiographical writings by Rosie Jackson

Twelve Angry Persons

The Jury: Trial and Error in the American Courtroom by Stephen J. Adler

We, the Jury: The Jury System and the Ideal of Democracy by Jeffrey Abramson

The Private Diary of an O.J. Juror: Behind the Scenes of the Trial of the Century by Michael Knox, by Mike Walker

Hung Jury: The Diary of a Menendez Juror by Hazel Thornton, with commentaries by Lawrence J. Wrightsman, by Amy J. Posey, by Alan Scheflin

No Trumpets, No Drums

The Sorrow of War: A Novel of North Vietnam by Bao Ninh, translated by Phan Thanh Hao

Novel Without a Name by Duong Thu Huong, translated by Phan Huy Duong, by Nina McPherson

Paradise of the Blind by Duong Thu Huong, translated by Phan Huy Duong, by Nina McPherson

To Keep and Bear Arms

Second Amendment Symposium Issue Tennessee Law Review, Spring 1995

A Right to Bear Arms: State and Federal Bills of Rights and Constitutional Guarantees by Stephen P. Halbrook

To Keep and Bear Arms: The Origins of an Anglo-American Right by Joyce Lee Malcolm

Guns, Crime, and Freedom by Wayne LaPierre, foreword by Tom Clancy

An Argument, Shewing, that a Standing Army Is inconsistent with A Free Government, and absolutely destructive to the Constitution of the English Monarchy by John Trenchard

Contributors

Ian Buruma is currently the Paul R. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard College. His previous books include Year Zero: A History of 1945, Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance, Taming the Gods: Religion and Democracy on Three Continents, and Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of its Enemies. He writes frequently for The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, and the Financial Times. His new book is a collection of essays, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the Shadows of War, to be published in September 2014.

Timothy Ferris is Emeritus Professor of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. His latest book, The Science of Liberty: Democracy, Reason, and the Laws of Nature, was published in February. (March 2010)

Andrew Hacker teaches political science at Queens College. He is currently working on a book on mathematics. 
 (January 2014)

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. Her books include Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce. Her new book, Flyover Lives, was published in January 2014.

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Jeff Madrick is Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz ­Rediscovery Government Initiative at the Century Foundation, Editor of Challenge Magazine, and teaches at the Cooper Union. His forthcoming book is Seven Bad Ideas: How Mainstream Econ­omists Damaged America and the World, to be published in the fall of 2014.

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China and was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London.
 (July 2014)

Marc Romano is a writer living in New York City. He has translated two other novels by Georges Simenon, both published by New York Review Books: Dirty Snow (with Louise Varèse) and Three Bedrooms in Manhattan (with Lawrence G. Blochman).

Charles Rosen is a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Stephen Spender (1909–1995) was an English poet and essayist. As a young man, he became friends with W.H. Auden, Louis MacNeice, Cecil Day-Lewis, and Christopher Isherwood, a loose collection often referred to as “the Auden Group” or “MacSpaunday.” He published many collections of poems, including The Still Centre and Ruins and Visions, and numerous volumes of nonfiction and other works, including Learning Laughterand Love-Hate Relations.

Patricia Storace is the author of Heredity, a book of poems, Dinner with Persephone, a travel memoir about Greece, and Sugar Cane, a children’s book. Her new novel is new novel is A Book of Heaven. She lives in New York.

Keith Thomas is a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is the author The Ends of Life: Roads to Fulfillment in Early Modern England.

Garry Wills is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern. His new book, Making Make-Believe Real: Politics as Theater in Shakespeare’s Time, will be published in the summer 2014.

Warren Zimmermann, a professor of international diplomacy at Columbia University, was US Ambassador to Yugoslavia from 1989 to 1992. A revised edition of his book, Origins of a Catastrophe:Yugoslavia and Its Destroyers, has just been published in paperback. (June 1999)