Contents


The Last ‘Last Supper’

Leonardo: The Last Supper with essays by Pinin Brambilla Barcilon and Pietro C. Marani,translated from the Italian by Harlow Tighe

Il Genio e le Passioni: Leonardo e il Cenacolo: Precedenti, innovazioni, riflessi di un capolavoro (The Genius and the Passions: Leonardo and the Last Supper: Precedents, Innovations, Reflections of a Masterpiece) Catalog of the exhibition edited by Pietro C. Marani, with a preface by Ernst H. Gombrich

Leonardo da Vinci by Sherwin B. Nuland

Leonardo: The First Scientist by Michael White

Ice Capades

Barrow’s Boys: A Stirring Story of Daring, Fortitude, and Downright Lunacy by Fergus Fleming

Antarctica: Firsthand Accounts of Exploration and Endurance edited by Charles Neider

Let Heroes Speak: Antarctic Explorers by Michael H. Rosove

Ice Bound: A Doctor’s Incredible Battle for Survival at the South Pole by Dr. Jerri Nielsen

The Ice Master: The Doomed 1913 Voyage of the Karluk by Jennifer Niven

In the Land of White Death: An Epic Story of Survival in the Siberian Arctic by Valerian Albanov

Great Exploration Hoaxes by David Roberts

The Mountains of My Life by Walter Bonatti

Bayreuth Blues

The Wagners: The Dramas of a Musical Dynasty by Nike Wagner, translated from the German by Ewald Osers and Michael Downes

Contributors

Hussein Agha is Senior Associate Member of St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and coauthor of A Framework for a Palestinian National Security Doctrine. (November 2012)

Al Alvarez is the author of Risky Business, a selection of essays, many of which first appeared in The New York Review of Books.

Elizabeth Drew is a regular contributor to The New York Review and the former Washington correspondent of The New Yorker and The Atlantic.

 (September 2013)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Charles Hope was Director of the Warburg Institute, London, from 2001 to 2010. He is the author of Titian.


Richard Horton is a physician. He edits The Lancet, a weekly medical journal based in London and New York. He is also a visiting professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Sylvie Kauffmann is the US correspondent for the French newspaper Le Monde. (August 2001)

Joseph Kerman is emeritus professor of music at the University of California, Berkeley. He began writing music criticism for The Hudson Review in the 1950s, and is a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books and many other journals. His books include Opera as Drama (1956; new and revised edition 1988), The Beethoven Quartets (1967), Contemplating Music (1986), Concerto Conversations (1999), and The Art of Fugue (2005).

Sergei Kovalev, a biologist and former political prisoner, is a leading candidate on the Yabloko Party list for the December election to the Russian State Duma. He is President of the Institute for Human Rights and Chairman of the Andrei Sakharov Foundation in Moscow. (November 2007)

John Lanchester is the author of five books including, most recently, I.O.U.: Why Everyone Owes Everyone and No One Can Pay. In 2008 he received the E.M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.
 (December 2011)

Alison Lurie is Frederic J. Whiton Professor of American Literature Emerita at Cornell. She is the author of two collections of essays on children’s literature, Don’t Tell the Grownups and Boys and Girls Forever, and the editor of The Oxford Book of Fairy Tales. Her most recent novel is Truth and Consequences.


Robert Malley is Middle East and North Africa Program Director at the International Crisis Group. He is writing here in his personal capacity. (November 2012)

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

Toni Morrison, Robert F. Goheen Professor at Princeton, is the author of seven novels. She received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1993. (August 2001)

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His most recent book is Stolen Glimpses, Captive ­Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012.


Robert Skidelsky is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at Warwick University, England. His latest book is How Much Is Enough?: Money and the Good Life with Edward Skidelsky. He is the author of a three-volume biography of John Maynard Keynes.
 (April 2014)

James Traub is a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine. He is currently writing a book about Times Square. (February 2002)

Colm Tóibín is the Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His most recent book is The Testament of Mary.


John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit: Angstrom, he two of which, Rabbit is Richand Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.