Contents


Anatomy of a Murder

Blood on the Moon: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln by Edward Steers Jr.

Lincoln’s Assassins: Their Trial and Execution by James L. Swanson and Daniel R. Weinberg

A Soft Spot for Napoleon

Napoleon and Berlin: The Franco-Prussian War in North Germany, 1813 by Michael V. Leggiere

Napoleon by Paul Johnson

Napoleon: A Biography by Frank McLynn

Napoleon Bonaparte: England’s Prisoner by Frank Giles

Should We Adore Adorno?

Philosophy of Modern Music by Theodor W. Adorno, translated from the German by Anne G. Mitchell and Wesley V. Blomster

Essays on Music by Theodor W. Adorno, selected and with an introduction, commentary, and notes by Richard Leppert, and new translations from the German by Susan H. Gillespie

Beethoven: The Philosophy of Music by Theodor W. Adorno, edited by Rolf Tiedemann, translated from the German by Edmond Jephcott

Contributors

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.
 (November 2016)

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

J.M. Coetzee is Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide. He is the author of sixteen works of fiction, as well as many works of criticism and translation. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003.
 (January 2017)

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

Denis Donoghue is Emeritus University Professor of English and American Letters at NYU. (April 2016)

Amos Elon (1926–2009) was an Israeli journalist. His final book was The Pity of It All: A Portrait of Jews In Germany 1743 – 1933.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (October 2017)

Stuart Hampshire (1914–2004) was an English philosopher. He taught at University College London, Princeton, Stanford and Oxford, where he was named Warden of Wadham College. His books include Thought and Action, Spinoza and Justice Is Conflict.

Václav Havel (1936–2011) was the last president of Czechoslovakia and the first president of the Czech Republic. Havel was one of the six signers of the statement “Tibet: The Peace of the Graveyard.”

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. His books include The Art of Stillness and The Man Within My Head.
 (June 2017)

Mark Lilla is Professor of Humanities at Columbia. With New York Review Books he has published The Shipwrecked Mind: On Political Reaction (2016), The Reckless Mind: Intellectuals in Politics (2nd. ed., 2016), and, with Robert Silvers and Ronald Dworkin, The Legacy of Isaiah Berlin (2001). His other books include G.B. Vico: The Making of an Anti-Modern (1994), The Stillborn God: Religion, Politics, and the Modern West (2007), and, most recently, The Once and Future Liberal: On Political Reaction (2017). He was the 2015 Overseas Press Club of America winner of the Best Commentary on International News in Any Medium for his New York Review series “On France.” Visit marklilla.com.

Hilary Mantel is an English novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her novel, Wolf Hall, won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Life and Work: Writers, Readers, and the Conversations Between Them and the novel In Extremis. (November 2017)

Charles Rosen was a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. His latest book is Scribbled in the Dark, a volume of poetry. (November 2017)

John Weightman (1915–2004) was a critic and literary scholar. After working as a translator and announcer for the BBC French service, Weightman turned to the study of French literature. He taught at King’s College London and the University of London. His books include The Concept of the Avant-Gardeand The Cat Sat on the Mat: Language and the Absurd.

Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas, Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book is To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science. His essay in this issue is based on the fourth annual Patrusky Lecture of the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, delivered in San Antonio in October 2016. (January 2017)

Paul Wilson’s translation of Bohumil Hrabal’s early stories, Mr. Kafka and Other Tales from the Time of the Cult, is published this month. (November 2015)

Bertram Wyatt-Brown is Richard J. Milbauer Professor of History at the University of Florida. His most recent books are The Shaping of Southern Culture: Honor, Grace, and War and the forthcoming Hearts of Darkness: Wellsprings of a Southern Literary Tradition. (October 2002)