Contents


The Truth About Muslims

The Cross and the Crescent: Christianity and Islam from Muhammad to the Reformation by Richard Fletcher

From Babel to Dragomans: Interpreting the Middle East by Bernard Lewis

In the Lands of the Christians: Arab Travel Writing in the Seventeenth Century edited and translated by Nabil Matar

Turks, Moors, and Englishmen in the Age of Discovery by Nabil Matar

Islam in Britain, 1558–1685 by Nabil Matar

Start Spreading the News

Holland Mania: The Unknown Dutch Period in American Art and Culture by Annette Stott

The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony That Shaped America by Russell Shorto

Dreams of Empire

America’s Inadvertent Empire by William E. Odom and Robert Dujarric

The Imperial Tense: Prospects and Problems of American Empire edited by Andrew J. Bacevich

Resurrecting Empire: Western Footprints and America’s Perilous Path in the Middle East by Rashid Khalidi

The Right Nation: Conservative Power in America by John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge

Empire by Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri

Multitude by Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri

The New Imperialism by David Harvey

Fear: The History of a Political Idea by Corey Robin

A New World Order by Anne-Marie Slaughter

The Reigns in Spain

Rivers of Gold: The Rise of the Spanish Empire, from Columbus to Magellan by Hugh Thomas

Romans in a New World: Classical Models in Sixteenth-Century Spanish America by David A. Lupher

Juan de Ovando: Governing the Spanish Empirein the Reign of Philip II by Stafford Poole

Apogee of Empire: Spain and New Spain in the Age of Charles III, 1759–1789 by Stanley J. Stein and Barbara H. Stein

Spain in the Age of Exploration, 1492–1819 Catalog of the exhibition edited by Chiyo Ishikawa

Taking Reality by Surprise

The Dreamers a film directed by Bernardo Bertolucci

The Dreamers by Gilbert Adair

Afterglow: A Last Conversation with Pauline Kael by Frances Davis

Godard: Portrait of the Artist at Seventy by Colin MacCabe

Contributors

Kwame Anthony Appiah teaches philosophy at Princeton. His latest book is The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen.

 (November 2012)

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.
 (November 2016)

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Robert Cottrell is Editor of The Browser. He has served as Moscow bureau chief for both The Economist and the Financial Times. (December 2017)

William Dalrymple’s books include The Last Mughal: The Fall of a Dynasty, Delhi 1857 and Return of a King: The Battle for Afghanistan, 1839–42. He is Codirector of the Jaipur Literature Festival.
 (November 2016)

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His most recent book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War. His work can be found at www
.markdanner.com.
 (March 2017)

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


J. H. Elliott is Regius Professor Emeritus of Modern History at ­Oxford. His books include Spain, Europe and the Wider World, 1500–1800 and ­History in the Making. (June 2016)

Michael Ignatieff is President of Central European University in Budapest. His books include Isaiah Berlin: A Life and The Lesser Evil: Political Ethics in an Age of Terror.
 (April 2017)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Hermione Lee is President of Wolfson College, Oxford. Her most recent book is a biography of Penelope Fitzgerald. (September 2016)

Joseph Lelyveld’s most recent book is His Final Battle: The Last Months of Franklin Roosevelt. (November 2017)

Anthony Lewis, a former columnist for The New York Times, has twice won the Pulitzer Prize. His latest book is Freedom for the Thought That We Hate: A Biography of the First Amendment.

Mark Lilla is Professor of Humanities at Columbia. With New York Review Books he has published The Shipwrecked Mind: On Political Reaction (2016), The Reckless Mind: Intellectuals in Politics (2nd. ed., 2016), and, with Robert Silvers and Ronald Dworkin, The Legacy of Isaiah Berlin (2001). His other books include G.B. Vico: The Making of an Anti-Modern (1994), The Stillborn God: Religion, Politics, and the Modern West (2007), and, most recently, The Once and Future Liberal: On Political Reaction (2017). He was the 2015 Overseas Press Club of America winner of the Best Commentary on International News in Any Medium for his New York Review series “On France.” Visit marklilla.com.

Lewis Lockwood is an Emeritus Professor of Music at Harvard and Co-Director of the Boston University Center for Beethoven Research. A paperback edition of his book Beethoven’s Symphonies: An Artistic Vision will be published in February.
 (January 2017)

Norman Mailer (1923-2007) was born in Long Branch, New Jersey, and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. In 1955 he co-founded The Village Voice. He is the author of more than thirty books, including The Naked and the Dead; The Armies of the Night, for which he won a National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize; The Executioner’s Song, for which he won his second Pulitzer Prize; Harlot’s Ghost; Oswald’s Tale; The Gospel According to the Son; and The Castle in the Forest.

Lorrie Moore is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English at Vanderbilt and the author of four story collections and three novels. Her most recent novel is A Gate at the Stairs and her most recent collection of stories is Bark. (August 2017)

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

Benjamin Moser is the author of Why This World: A Biography of Clarice Lispector and the editor of the new translations of Lispector’s works at New Directions. He is a columnist for the New York Times Book Review and is currently completing the authorized biography of Susan Sontag.

Thomas Powers’s books include The Confirmation, a novel, and The Killing of Crazy Horse. (April 2017)

Alan Ryan’s On Tocqueville and On Marx were published last year. He is the author of the two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought: From Herodotus to the Present. He is visiting professor of philosophy at Stanford.


Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. His latest book is Scribbled in the Dark, a volume of poetry. (November 2017)

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life.

Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas, Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book is To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science. His essay in this issue is based on the fourth annual Patrusky Lecture of the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, delivered in San Antonio in October 2016. (January 2017)

Garry Wills is the subject of a Festchrift published by Northwestern’s Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Nation and World, Church and God: The Legacy of Garry Wills. (April 2017)

Michael Wood is Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. He is the author of Hitchcock: The Man Who Knew Too Much and America in the Movies, among other books.
 (May 2017)