Contents


Morality Tale

Ishi’s Brain: In Search of America’s Last “Wild” Indian by Orin Starn

Ishi in Three Centuries edited by Karl Kroeber and Clifton Kroeber

Empire, Anyone?

Surprise, Security, and the American Experience by John Lewis Gaddis

War and the American Presidency by Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr.

Russia: Unmanifest Destiny

Taming the Wild Field: Colonization and Empire on the Russian Steppe by Willard Sunderland

History, Memory, and Identity in Post-Soviet Estonia: The End of a Collective Farm by Sigrid Rausing

The Siberian Curse: How Communist Planners Left Russia Out in the Cold by Fiona Hill and Clifford G. Gaddy

Abu Ghraib: The Hidden Story

Final Report of the Independent Panel to Review DoD Detention Operations (The Schlesinger Report) by James R. Schlesinger, Harold Brown, Tillie K. Fowler, and General Charles A. Horner (USAF-Ret.)

AR 15-6 Investigation of the Abu Ghraib Detention Facility and 205th Military Intelligence Brigade by Major General George R. Fay

Contributors

John Brewerteaches in the Humanities and Social Sciences Division at the California Institute of Technology. His most recent book is A Sentimental Murder: Love and Madness in the Eighteenth Century. (June 2008)

James Chace is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Government and Public Law at Bard College. He is the author of Acheson and, most recently, 1912: The Election That Changed the Country. He is now working on a biography of Lafayette. (October 2004)

Robert Cottrell has served as a Moscow bureau chief for both The Economist and the Financial Times. (June 2007)

Mark Danner is the author, most recently, of Stripping Bare the Body: Politics Violence War. He is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the ­Humanities at Bard. His writing and other work can be found at markdanner.com.

Jason Epstein, former Editorial Director at Random House, was a founder of The New York Review and of the Library of America. He is the author of Eating: A Memoir. (Dectember 2013)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Clifford Geertz (1926–2006) was an anthropologist. Widely recognized as the most influential American anthropologist of the twentieth century, Geertz championed the role of symbols in the creation and interpretation of social meaning. His many books include Peddlers and Princes: Social Development and Economic Change in Two Indonesian Towns and Available Light: Anthropological Reflections on Philosophical Topics.

Seamus Heaney’s first poetry collection, Death of a Naturalist, appeared forty years ago. Since then he has published poetry, criticism, and translations that have established him as one of the leading poets of his generation. In 1995 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Michael Kimmelman is Chief Architecture Critic of The New York Times.
 (June 2014)

Robert Malley is Middle East and North Africa Program Director at the International Crisis Group. He is writing here in his personal capacity. (November 2012)

Robin Robertson is from the northeast coast of Scotland. His fifth collection of poetry will be published next year. (June 2012)

Ingrid D. Rowland is a professor, based in Rome, at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. A frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, she is the author of The Culture of the High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome and The Scarith of Scornello: A Tale of Renaissance Forgery. She has also published a translation of Vitruvius’ Ten Books of Architecture and a history of Villa Taverna, the US ambassador’s residence in Rome. Her new book is From Pompeii: The Afterlife of a Roman Town.


Norman Rush was raised in Oakland, California, and graduated from Swarthmore College in 1956. He has been an antiquarian book dealer, a college instructor, and, with his wife Elsa, he lived and worked in Africa from 1978 to 1983. They now reside in Rockland County, New York. His stories have appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and Best American Short Stories. Whites, a collection of stories, was published in 1986, and his first novel, Mating, the recipient of the National Book Award, was published in 1991. Mortals is his second novel. A new novel, Subtle Bodies, will be published in September 2013.


Colm Tóibín is the Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His most recent book is The Testament of Mary.