Contents


The Glory of Certain Moments in Life’

All That Is by James Salter

Memorable Days: The Selected Letters of James Salter and Robert Phelps edited by John McIntyre

Life Is Meals: A Food Lover’s Book of Days by James and Kay Salter

There and Then: The Travel Writing of James Salter by James Salter

Is Humbert Humbert Jewish?

The Secret History of Vladimir Nabokov by Andrea Pitzer

The Tragedy of Mister Morn by Vladimir Nabokov, translated from the Russian by Thomas Karshan and Anastasia Tolstoy

Selected Poems by Vladimir Nabokov, translated from the Russian by Dmitri Nabokov, and edited and with an introduction by Thomas Karshan

Stalking Nabokov: Selected Essays by Brian Boyd

How the Case for Austerity Has Crumbled

The Alchemists: Three Central Bankers and a World on Fire by Neil Irwin

Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea by Mark Blyth

The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America by David A. Stockman

Visions of Indian Art

Wonder of the Age: Master Painters of India, 1100–1900 by John Guy and Jorrit Britschgi

Masters of Indian Painting, 1100–1900 edited by Milo C. Beach, Eberhard Fischer, and B.N. Goswamy

Contributors

Anne Applebaum is a columnist for The Washington Post and Slate, and runs the Transitions Forum at the Legatum Institute. 
Her most recent book is Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern ­Europe, 1944–1956.

 (December 2014)

Julian Bell is a painter and writer living in Lewes, England. His Van Gogh: A Power Seething will be published in early 2015. (December 2014)

Mischa Berlinski is the author of Fieldwork: A Novel. He lived in Haiti between 2007 and 2011. (June 2013)

Christian Caryl is a Senior Fellow at the Legatum Institute and the editor of Foreign Policy’s Democracy Lab website. His latest book is Strange Rebels: 1979 and the Birth of the 21st Century.

Dan Chiasson’s fourth collection of poetry is Bicentennial.
 (January 2015)

Roger Cohen is a columnist for The New York Times. His family memoir, The Girl from Human Street: Ghosts of Memory in a Jewish Family, will be published in January 2015.
 (December 2014)

William Dalrymple’s books include The Last Mughal: The Fall of a Dynasty, Delhi 1857 and Return of a King: The Battle for Afghanistan, 1839–42. He is codirector of the Jaipur Literature Festival.
 (October 2014)

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

Michael Dirda, a weekly book columnist for The Washington Post, received the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for criticism. He is the author of the memoir An Open Book and of four collections of essays: Readings, Bound to Please, Book by Book, and Classics for Pleasure. His most recent book, On Conan Doyle, received a 2012 Edgar Award for best critical/biographical work of the year.
 Dirda graduated with Highest Honors in English from Oberlin College and earned a Ph.D. in comparative literature (medieval studies and European romanticism) from Cornell University. He is a contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, the online Barnes & Noble Review, and several other periodicals, as well as a frequent lecturer and an occasional college teacher. His new book, ­Browsings: A Year of Reading, Collecting, and Living with Books, will be out next summer.

Jerzy Ficowski was a Polish poet and scholar who wrote several volumes of poetry, including A Reading of Ashes, as well as a biography of the novelist Bruno Schulz. (June 2013)

Mark Ford’s Selected Poems will be published in April. He teaches in the English Department at University College London. (February 2014)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He currently leads the Free Speech Debate project at Oxford (freespeechdebate.com) and is writing a book about free speech.


James Gleick’s latest book is The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood. He is working on a history of time travel.

Jerome Groopman is the Recanati Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chief of Experimental Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He has published more than 180 scientific articles, is a staff writer at The New Yorker and, most recently, the coauthor with Pamela Hartzband of Your Medical Mind: How to Decide What Is Right for You.


Jennifer Grotz’s most recent book of poems is The Needle. (June 2013)

Hank Heifetz is a poet and translator from Spanish, Sanskrit, and Tamil.
 (June 2013)

Bill Keller is an Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times, of which he is a former executive editor. He was the Times bureau chief in Johannesburg from 1992 to 1995.
 (March 2013)

Enrique Krauze is the author of Redeemers: Ideas and Power in Latin America. He is Editor in Chief of the magazine Letras Libres and was, for twenty years, Deputy Editor of Vuelta, whose editor was Octavio Paz. (June 2013)

Paul Krugman is a columnist for The New York Times and ­Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Princeton. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2008.
 (October 2014)

Joseph Lelyveld is a former correspondent and editor of 
The New York Times. His latest book is Great Soul: Mahatma ­Gandhi and His Struggle with India. (December 2014)

Ray Monk is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Southampton. He has written books on Wittgenstein and Bertrand Russell. His most recent book, on Robert Oppenheimer, was published in May.
 (June 2013)

Andrew O’Hagan’s new novel, The Illuminations, will be published early next year. (October 2014)

Fintan O’Toole is Literary Editor of The Irish Times and Leonard L. Milberg Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at ­Princeton. His latest book is A History of Ireland in 100 Objects.
 (November 2014)

Piotr Sommer is a Polish poet and translator. (June 2013)

Susan Sontag (1933–2004) was a novelist, playwright, filmmaker, and one of the most influential critics of her generation. Her books include Against Interpretation, On Photography, Illness as Metaphor, and The Volcano Lover.

Jenny Uglow’s most recent book is The Pinecone: The Story of Sarah Losh.
 (April 2014)

Christopher de Bellaigue was born in London in 1971 and has worked as a journalist in the Middle East and South Asia since 1994. His first book, In the Rose Garden of the Martyrs: A Memoir of Iran, was shortlisted for the Royal Society of Literature’s Ondaatje Prize. His latest book is Patriot of Persia: Muhammad Mossadegh and a Tragic Anglo-American Coup. He lives in Tehran with his wife and two children.