Inside the Deportation Courts

President Trump’s transformation of immigration law is being executed at sixty-odd courts around the country dedicated to processing migrants. The administration has taken legislation passed quietly over the years and used it to drive through large-scale changes to immigrant rights. Unlike the judges in federal or state courts, immigration judges don’t have judicial independence. They are part of the executive branch rather than the judicial branch. They can be fired or reassigned by the attorney general, and they face sanctions if they don’t process cases rapidly. The Trump administration has hired nearly two hundred new judges and plans to add at least a hundred more. Nearly half of sitting immigration judges were appointed by Trump, and about half of these new judges had previously been attorneys for ICE, according to the Associated Press.
More 

Featured Articles




Australia’s Shame
The argument against Australia’s treatment of asylum-seekers can be made as trenchantly on the basis of a single case as on that of a thousand

Table of contents
Burning Down the House
‘The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming’ by David Wallace-Wells and ‘Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out?’ by Bill McKibben
Real Americans
‘This America: The Case for the Nation’ by Jill Lepore and ‘This Land Is Our Land: An Immigrant’s Manifesto’ by Suketu Mehta
Keeping Up Appearances
‘The Chief: The Life and Turbulent Times of Chief Justice John Roberts’ by Joan Biskupic and ‘The Company They Keep: How Partisan Divisions Came to the Supreme Court’ by Neal Devins and Lawrence Baum

Table of contents

Table of contents

Table of contents

Table of contents