Song of My Self-Care

There was a time when the Internet seemed to promise the world to the world. When it appeared to be opening up a benign, infinite network of possibilities, in which everyone was enfranchised and newly accessible to one another as they were drawn, in one of Jia Tolentino’s many felicitous phrases, to the “puddles and blossoms of other people’s curiosity and expertise.” It would be a world in which hierarchies in whatever guise would be upended, a democratic forum to rival and exceed the philosophical marketplace of ancient Greece (no exclusion of anyone, not women, not slaves). At the very least, it was a place where, because you could be sure that someone out there was listening, you would find yourself able to articulate the thoughts that, for lack of an audience, had previously threatened to remain forever unspoken, stuck to the tip of your tongue.
More 

Featured Articles




Australia’s Shame
The argument against Australia’s treatment of asylum-seekers can be made as trenchantly on the basis of a single case as on that of a thousand

Table of contents
Burning Down the House
‘The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming’ by David Wallace-Wells and ‘Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out?’ by Bill McKibben
Real Americans
‘This America: The Case for the Nation’ by Jill Lepore and ‘This Land Is Our Land: An Immigrant’s Manifesto’ by Suketu Mehta
Keeping Up Appearances
‘The Chief: The Life and Turbulent Times of Chief Justice John Roberts’ by Joan Biskupic and ‘The Company They Keep: How Partisan Divisions Came to the Supreme Court’ by Neal Devins and Lawrence Baum

Table of contents

Table of contents

Table of contents

Table of contents