Contents


The Republicans’ War

The Freshmen: What Happened to the Republican Revolution? by Linda Killian

Conservative Reformers: The Republican Freshmen and the Lessons of the 104th Congress by Nicol C. Rae

Lessons Learned the Hard Way: A Personal Report by Newt Gingrich

Sexual McCarthyism: Clinton, Starr, and the Emerging Constitutional Crisis by Alan M. Dershowitz

The Genius of the Glass House

Julia Margaret Cameron’s Women 1998-January 10, 1999; the Museum of Modern Art, New York, January 27-May 24, 1999; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, August 27-November 30, 1999. an exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, September 19,, Catalog of the exhibition by Sylvia Wolf and others

The Black Arts

Secrecy: The American Experience by Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Bay of Pigs Declassified edited by Peter Kornbluh

High Wire Acts

Logbook by Renzo Piano

Renzo Piano Building Workshop: Complete Works in three volumes and Peter Buchanan

Technology, Place & Architecture: The Jerusalem Seminar in Architecture edited by Kenneth Frampton

The Great Black Hope

King of the World: Muhammad Ali and the Rise of an American Hero by David Remnick

More Than a Champion: The Style of Muhammad Ali by Jan Philipp Reemtsma, translated by John E. Woods

Contributors

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written over seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty. His ­memoir, A Tokyo Romance, has just been published. (April 2018)

Rosemary Dinnage’s books include The Ruffian on the Stair, One to One: Experiences of Psychotherapy, and Annie Besant.

Helen Epstein teaches at Bard and is the author, most recently, of Another Fine Mess: America, Uganda, and the War on Terror. (June 2018)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: ­Poems, 1968–2011. (July 2018)

Martin Filler’s Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume III: From Antoni Gaudí to Maya Lin, a collection of his writing on architecture in these pages, will be published in September. (May 2018)

Flora Lewis is a columnist based in Paris. Her most recent book is Europe: Road to Unity. (February 1999)

Janet Malcolm’s latest book is Forty-one False Starts: Essays on Artists and Writers. Her next essay collection, Nobody’s Looking at You, will be published next year. (July 2018)

James McPherson is George Henry Davis ’86 Professor of American History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1989, and, most ­recently, The War That Forged a Nation: Why the Civil War Still Matters.
 (October 2016)

Lars-Erik Nelson (1941-2000) was the Washington columnist for the New York Daily News, and a frequent contributor to the Review.

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Life and Work: Writers, Readers, and the Conversations Between Them and the novel In Extremis. (November 2017)

Thomas Powers’s books include The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA and Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda. (April 2018)

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Garry Wills, whose most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters, is the 2018 commencement speaker at Zaytuna College, the first accredited Muslim campus in America. (June 2018)