Contents


A Magus of the North

The Blue Fox by Sjón, translated from the Icelandic by Victoria Cribb

From the Mouth of the Whale by Sjón, translated from the Icelandic by Victoria Cribb

The Whispering Muse by Sjón, translated from the Icelandic by Victoria Cribb

The Coach

Dancing on Water: A Life in Ballet, from the Kirov to the ABT by Elena Tchernichova, with Joel Lobenthal

Contributors

A. S. Byatt’s most recent book is Ragnarok: The End of the Gods. Her novel Possession won the Booker Prize in 1990. (October 2013)

Andrew Delbanco is Alexander Hamilton Professor of American Studies at Columbia.
 (November 2016)

Hugh Eakin is the Gilder Lehrman Fellow in American History at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. (November 2017)

Robert Gottlieb has been Editor in Chief of Simon and ­Schuster, Knopf, and The New Yorker. His essay collection Near-Death ­Experiences…and Others will be published in June. (April 2018)

Jerome Groopman is the Recanati Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Chief of Experimental Medicine at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and a staff writer at The New Yorker. He is the coauthor, with Pamela Hartzband, of Your Medical Mind: How to Decide What Is Right for You. 
(June 2018)

Maya Jasanoff is Professor of History at Harvard. She is the author of Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World and Edge of Empire: Lives, Culture, and Conquest in the East 1750–1850. (October 2016)

Hilary Mantel is an English novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her novel, Wolf Hall, won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

Fintan O’Toole is a columnist with The Irish Times and Leonard L. Milberg Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at Prince­ton. His writings on Brexit have won both the European Press Prize and the Orwell Prize for journalism. (June 2018)

Geoffrey O’Brien’s books include The Phantom Empire: Movies in the Mind of the 20th Century, Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012, and, most recently, the poetry collection The Blue Hill. (August 2018)

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Life and Work: Writers, Readers, and the Conversations Between Them and the novel In Extremis. (November 2017)

Robert O. Paxton is Mellon Professor Emeritus of Social Science at Columbia and the author of The Anatomy of Fascism, Vichy France, and, with Michael Marrus, Vichy France and the Jews, among other works. (May 2018)

Nicolas Pelham is The Economist’s Middle East correspondent. His most recent book is Holy Lands: Reviving Pluralism in the Middle East. (October 2016)

Darryl Pinckney’s most recent book is a novel, Black Deutschland. (August 2018)

Francine Prose is a Distinguished Visiting Writer at Bard. Her most recent book is the novel Mister Monkey. (December 2017)

Jonathan Raban’s books include Surveillance, My Holy War, Arabia, Old Glory, Hunting Mister Heartbreak, Bad Land, Passage to Juneau, and Waxwings. His most recent book is Driving Home: An American Journey, published in 2011. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, the PEN/West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, and the Governor’s Award of the State of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, and The Independent. He lives in Seattle.

Pierre Reverdy (1889–1960) was born in Narbonne in the south of France. At age twenty-one he moved to Paris and became close friends with the artists and writers around Montmartre, particularly with the poets Max Jacob and Guillaume Apollinaire and the painter Juan Gris. During this time, he converted to Catholicism, founded the seminal literary magazine Nord-Sud, married the seamstress Henriette Charlotte Bureau, and began a deep and intimate friendship with Coco Chanel that would last for the rest of his life. In 1926, after publishing several books of poetry that included collaborations with Gris, Picasso, and Georges Braque, he moved with his wife to the village of Solesmes to be near the Benedictine monastery at St. Peter’s Abbey. During the Nazi occupation, he joined the Resistance, refused to publish anything, and wrote the excruciatingly brutal Le Chant de morts (Song of the Dead) that was eventually published in 1948 with illustrations by Picasso. Besides a few trips around Europe and Greece, Reverdy remained in Solesmes for the rest of his life, ever more estranged from society and from his own faith.

Alisa Roth is an Editor of the public radio program Life of the Law and has reported on refugee and asylum issues in many countries of Europe and the Middle East. (October 2013)

Cathleen Schine’s latest novel is They May Not Mean to but They Do. (August 2018)

Amartya Sen teaches economics and philosophy at Harvard. He was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1998. (June 2017)

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. Come Closer and Listen, his latest book of poems, will be out next year. (August 2018)

Garry Wills, whose most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters, is the 2018 commencement speaker at Zaytuna College, the first accredited Muslim campus in America. (June 2018)