Contents


The Polish Revolution

The Polish August: The Self-Limiting Revolution with a new afterword, by the Viking Press in April.) by Neal Ascherson

Poland Today: The State of the Republic compiled by "The Experience and the Future" Discussion Group, with an introduction by Jack Bielasiak

The Logic of Franz Kafka

Kafka: A Biography by Ronald Hayman

Kafka’s Other Trial: The Letters to Felice by Elias Canetti, translated by Christopher Middleton

Letters to Ottla and the Family by Franz Kafka, edited by N.N. Glatzer, translated by Richard Winston and Clara Winston

The Dream of Karl Rahner

Foundations of Christian Faith: An Introduction to the Idea of Christianity by Karl Rahner, translated by William V. Dych

Concern for the Church: Theological Investigations XX by Karl Rahner, translated by Edward Quinn

Contributors

Al Alvarez is the author of Risky Business, a selection of essays, many of which first appeared in The New York Review of Books.

Noel Annan (1916–2000) was a British military intelligence officer and scholar of European history. His works include Leslie Stephen and Our Age, Changing Enemies: The Defeat and Regeneration of Germany, and The Curious Strength of Positivism in English Political Thought.

Robert Brustein is a playwright, director, critic, teacher, founder of the Yale Repertory and American Repertory Theatres, and currently Distinguished Scholar in Residence at Suffolk University. His latest book is Winter Passages.
 (December 2014)

Robert Craft is a conductor and writer. Craft’s close working friendship with Igor Stravinsky is the subject of his memoir, An Improbable Life. In 2002 he was awarded the International Prix du Disque at the Cannes Music Festival.

István Deák is Seth Low Professor Emeritus at Columbia. He is the author, with Jan Gross and Tony Judt, of The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and Its Aftermath.

Irvin Ehrenpreis (1920–1985) was the Linden Kent Memorial Professor of English Literature at the University of Virginia. In 1984 he received the Christian Gauss Award from Phi Beta Kappa for the final volume of his trilogy, Swift: The Man, His Works, and the Age.

John Kenneth Galbraith (1908–2006) was a Canadian economist and politician. He taught at Princeton and Harvard. His works include The Affluent Society, The Age of Uncertainty and Economics and the Public Purpose. Galbraith’s many honors include the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Lomonosov Gold Medal, the Order of Canada, and the Padma Vibhushan, India’s second highest civilian award.

Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002) was an American geologist, biologist and historian of science. He taught at Harvard, where he was named Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology, and at NYU. His last book was Punctuated Equilibrium.

Stanley Hoffmann (1928-2015) was the Paul and Catherine Buttenwieser University Professor at Harvard. His most recent books are Chaos and Violence: What Globalization, Failed States, and Terrorism Mean for US Foreign Policy and Rousseau and Freedom, coedited with Christie McDonald.


Richard C. Lewontin is Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Biology at Harvard University. He is the author of The Genetic Basis of Evolutionary Change and Biology as Ideology, and the co-author of The Dialectical Biologist (with Richard Levins) and Not in Our Genes (with Steven Rose and Leon Kamin).

V.S. Pritchett (1900–1997) was a British essayist, novelist and short story writer. He worked as a foreign correspondent for the The Christian Science Monitorand as a literary critic forNew Statesman. In 1968 Pritchett was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire; he was knighted in 1975. His body of work includes many collections of short stories, in addition to travelogues, reviews, literary biographies and novels.

Leonard Schapiro was a British political scientist and one of the world’s foremost experts on Soviet politics. His works include The Communist Party of the Soviet Union and Russian Studies; he also translated Turgenev’s novel Spring Torrentsinto English.

Thomas Sheehan is Professor of Religious Studies at Stanford University. (December 2001)