Contents


Before the Revolution

King Solomon’s Mines Revisited: Western Interests and the Burdened History of South Africa by William Minter

Black and Gold by Anthony Sampson

South Africa: Time of Agony, Time of Destiny by Martin Murray

The Politics of Economic Power in Southern Africa by Ronald T. Libby

From World War to Cold War

Armed Truce: The Beginnings of the Cold War 1945–46 by Hugh Thomas

British Policy Towards the Soviet Union During the Second World War by Martin Kitchen

The Iron Curtain: Churchill, America, and the Origins of the Cold War by Fraser J. Harbutt

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Joan Didion is the author, most recently, of Blue Nights and The Year of Magical Thinking, among seven other works of nonfiction. Her five novels include A Book of Common Prayer and Democracy.
 (May 2016)

J. H. Elliott is Regius Professor Emeritus of Modern History at ­Oxford. His books include Spain, Europe and the Wider World, 1500–1800 and ­History in the Making. (June 2016)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. His most recent book is Free Speech: Ten Principles for a Connected World.
 (December 2017)

Christopher Jencks is the Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy at Harvard. He is the author of Rethinking Social Policy and The Homeless, among other books. (June 2016)

Lincoln Kirstein (1907–1996) was a writer and ballet critic. In 1946, together with George Balanchine, Kirstein founded the Ballet Society, which would soon be renamed The New York City Ballet. In 1984 he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Alison Lurie is the Frederic J. Whiton Professor of American Literature Emerita at Cornell. She is the author of ten novels, two collections of essays on children’s literature, and the editor of The Oxford Book of Fairy Tales. Her most recent book is Reading for Fun. (March 2017)

Felix Rohatyn is an investment banker and has been a governor of the New York Stock Exchange, Chairman of the New York Municipal Assistance Corporation, and US Ambassador to France. (October 2008)

Leonard Thompson is Charles J. Stillé Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His books include The Political Mythology of Apartheid and A History of South Africa. (May 1998)

Bernard Williams (1929–2003) was Deutsch Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley, and a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. His books include *Problems of the Self*, *Moral Luck*, *Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy*, and *Truth and Truthfulness*.

C. Vann Woodward (1908–1999) was a historian of the American South. He taught at Johns Hopkins and at Yale, where he was named the Sterling Professor of History. His books include Mary Chesnut’s Civil War and The Old World’s New World.