Contents


Wartime

Forged in Battle: The Civil War Alliance of Black Soldiers and White Officers by Joseph T. Glatthaar

The New York City Draft Riots: Their Significance for American Society and Politics in the Age of the Civil War by Iver Bernstein

Inside War: The Guerrilla Conflict in Missouri During the American Civil War by Michael Fellman

The Last Days of Hong Kong

Hong Kong Voices edited by Gerd Balke, with an introduction by Anthony Lawrence

Kowtow! by William Shawcross

City on the Rocks: Hong Kong’s Uncertain Future by Kevin Rafferty

Hong Kong Countdown by George Hicks

Rousseau in the Revolution

Rousseau and the Republic of Virtue: The Language of Politics in the French Revolution by Carol Blum

A Critical Dictionary of the French Revolution edited by François Furet, edited by Mona Ozouf

La Déclaration des droits de l’homme et du citoyen by Stéphane Rials

L’An I des droits de l’homme by A de Baecque and L.M. Vovelle and W. Schmale

Les Déclarations des droits de l’homme et du citoyen by Christine Fauré

The French Revolution and the Creation of Modern Political Culture, Volume II: The Political Culture of the Revolution edited by Colin Lucas

La Révolution des droits de l’homme by Marcel Gauchet

Contributors

Ian Buruma will be the new editor of The New York Review of Books in September 2017. He has been a frequent contributor to the Review since 1985. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Joseph Connors, the Director of the Harvard Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, Villa I Tatti, Florence, writes on Italian Renaissance and Baroque architecture. He was formerly Director of the American Academy in Rome and professor of art history at Columbia.

John Higham is Professor of History Emeritus at Johns Hopkins University and the editor of Civil Rights and Social Wrongs: Black—White Relations Since World War II, which has just been published. (November 1997)

James McPherson is George Henry Davis ’86 Professor of American History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1989, and, most ­recently, The War That Forged a Nation: Why the Civil War Still Matters.
 (October 2016)

M. F. Perutz (1914–2002) was an Austrian molecular biologist. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1962. He is the author of Is Science Necessary?, Protein Structure, and I Wish I’d Made You Angry Earlier.

Julia Preston is a contributing writer at the Marshall Project. From 2006 until 2016 she was the National Immigration Correspondent for The New York Times.
 (May 2017)

Marilynne Robinson is the author, most recently, of Lila, a novel, and The Givenness of Things: Essays. Her essay in this issue is drawn from her new book, What Are We Doing Here?, which will be published in February by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. (November 2017)

Felix Rohatyn is an investment banker and has been a governor of the New York Stock Exchange, Chairman of the New York Municipal Assistance Corporation, and US Ambassador to France. (October 2008)

Philip Roth was born in Newark, New Jersey, which has served as the setting for many of his novels. He won the National Book Award for his first book, Goodbye, Columbus, and for Sabbath’s Theater, the Pulitzer Prize for American Pastoral, and three PEN/Faulkner awards, for Operation Shylock, The Human Stain, and Everyman.

Quentin Skinner is Barber Beaumont Professor of the Humanities at Queen Mary, University of London. His latest book, Forensic Shakespeare, will be published later this year. (June 2014)

Jonathan Spence is Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. Among his books are The Death of Woman Wang, Treason by the Book, The Question of Hu, and The Search for Modern China.

Jean Starobinski is Professor Emeritus of French literature at the University of Geneva. Blessings in Disguise and Largesse are among his works in English. A translation of his recent Action et réaction is to appear later this year. (May 2003)