Contents


The Balkan Tragedy

The Fall of Yugoslavia: The Third Balkan War by Misha Glenny

The Destruction of Yugoslavia: Tracking the Break-up, 1980–92 by Branka Magaš

The Balkan Express: Fragments from the Other Side of War by Slavenka Drakulić

‘Anna of All the Russias’

The Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova, Updated and Expanded Edition translated by Judith Hemschemeyer, edited by Roberta Reeder

Remembering Anna Akhmatova by Anatoly Nayman, translated by Wendy Rosslyn

In a Shattered Mirror: The Later Poetry of Anna Akhmatova by Susan Amert

Hanging Out with Greeks

The Oldest Dead White European Males and Other Reflections on the Classics by Bernard Knox

New Perspectives in Early Greek Art England edited by Diana Buittron-Oliver

The Norton Book of Classical Literature edited by Bernard Knox

The Lost Kingdom of Orson Welles

This Is Orson Welles by Orson Welles and Peter Bogdanovich, edited by Jonathan Rosenbaum

This Is Orson Welles (audio tapes) conversations between Welles and Bogdanovich, edited by Jonathan Rosenbaum

The Cradle Will Rock a screenplay by Orson Welles, edited by James Pepper

The Magnificent Ambersons: A Reconstruction by Robert L. Carringer

The Truth About the CIA

Eclipse: The Last Days of the CIA by Mark Perry

Casey: From the OSS to the CIA by Joseph Persico

The Bear Trap: Afghanistan’s Untold Story by Gen. Mohammad Yousaf and Mark Adkin

The Red Web: MI6 and the KGB Master Coup by Tom Bower

The FBI–KGB War: A Special Agent’s Story by Robert J. Lamphere and Tom Schactman

Cold Warrior: James Jesus Angleton: The CIA’s Master Spy Hunter by Tom Mangold

Molehunt: The Secret Search for Traitors that Shattered the CIA by David Wise

No Other Choice: The Cold War Memoirs of the Ultimate Spy by George Blake

The Cambridge Spies: The Untold Story of Maclean, Philby, and Burgess in America by Verne W. Newton

The Spy Who Saved the World: How a Soviet Colonel Changed the Course of the Cold War by Jerrold L. Schechter and Peter S. Deriabin

The Central Intelligence Agency: An Instrument of Government, to 1950 by Arthur B. Darling

General Walter Bedell Smith as Director of Central Intelligence, October 1950–February 1953 by Ludwell Lee Montague

Moscow Station: How the KGB Penetrated the American Embassy by Ronald Kessler

The Old Boys: The American Elite and the Origins of the CIA by Burton Hersh

America’s Secret Eyes in Space: The U.S. Spy Satellite Program by Jeffrey T. Richelson

American Espionage and the Soviet Target by Jeffrey T. Richelson

Contributors

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

Amos Elon (1926–2009) was an Israeli journalist. His final book was The Pity of It All: A Portrait of Jews In Germany 1743 – 1933.

Timothy Ferris is Emeritus Professor of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. His latest book, The Science of Liberty: Democracy, Reason, and the Laws of Nature, was published in February. (March 2010)

Andrew Hacker teaches political science and mathematics at Queens College. His new book, The Math Myth and Other STEM ­Delusions, will appear next March.
 (July 2015)

Ann Hulbert is a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the author of The Interior Castle: The Art and Life of Jean Stafford. She is currently at work on a book about twentieth-century American child-rearing experts. (June 1998)

Michael Ignatieff is President of Central European University in Budapest. His books include Isaiah Berlin: A Life and The Lesser Evil: Political Ethics in an Age of Terror.
 (April 2017)

Joseph McBride’s books include Steven Spielberg: A Biography, Frank Capra: The Catastrophe of Success, Orson Welles, and Hawks on Hawks. His biography Searching for John Ford will be published in December. He writes a regular column on film for Irish America magazine. (July 1999)

Thomas Powers’s books include The Confirmation, a novel, and The Killing of Crazy Horse. (April 2017)

Alan Ryan’s On Tocqueville and On Marx were published last year. He is the author of the two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought: From Herodotus to the Present. He is visiting professor of philosophy at Stanford.


John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Garry Wills is the subject of a Festschrift published by Northwestern’s Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Nation and World, Church and God: The Legacy of Garry Wills. (April 2017)

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor Emeritus at Brown. His new book, Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, will be published in the fall.
 (May 2017)