Contents


Culture War

The Apotheosis of Captain Cook: European Mythmaking in the Pacific by Gananath Obeyesekere

How ‘Natives’ Think, About Captain Cook, for Example by Marshall Sahlins

Italy’s Dirty Linen

Getting the Boot: Italy’s Unfinished Revolution by Matt Frei

The Crisis of the Italian State: From the Origins of the Cold War to the Fall of Berlusconi by Patrick McCarthy

The Myth of Barry Goldwater

Barry Goldwater by Robert Alan Goldberg

Goldwater: The Man Who Made A Revolution by Lee Edwards

Turning Right in the Sixties: The Conservative Capture of the GOP by Mary C. Brennan

The Perfectionist

William Morris: A Life for Our Time by Fiona MacCarthy

The Collected Letters of William Morris edited by Norman Kelvin

Vol. I, 1848–1880

Vol. II, Part A, 1881–1884

Vol. II, Part B, 1885–1888

Vols. III and IV forthcoming

Contributors

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Clifford Geertz (1926–2006) was an anthropologist. Widely recognized as the most influential American anthropologist of the twentieth century, Geertz championed the role of symbols in the creation and interpretation of social meaning. His many books include Peddlers and Princes: Social Development and Economic Change in Two Indonesian Towns and Available Light: Anthropological Reflections on Philosophical Topics.

Richard Holmes books include Shelley, Footsteps, Coleridge, The Age of Wonder, and, most recently, Falling Upwards: How We Took to the Air. His memoir This Long Pursuit will be published next spring.
 (November 2016)

Richard Jenkyns, a Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, is Professor of the Classical Tradition at Oxford. His most recent book is Virgil’s Experience.(November 2001)

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas’s most recent books are The Hidden Life of Dogs, Certain Poor Shepherds, and The Tribe of Tiger: Cats and Their Culture.

John Maynard Smith, Professor of Biology at the University of Sussex, is the author of On Evolution, The Evolution of Sex, Evolution and the Theory of Games, and, with Eörs Szathmáry, The Major Transitions in Evolution. (December 2000)

Robert Mazzocco (1932–2017) was an American poet and critic.

William Shawcross is the author of several books on Cambodia. (December 1996)

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

John Weightman (1915–2004) was a critic and literary scholar. After working as a translator and announcer for the BBC French service, Weightman turned to the study of French literature. He taught at King’s College London and the University of London. His books include The Concept of the Avant-Gardeand The Cat Sat on the Mat: Language and the Absurd.