Contents


The Miracle at Chauvet

Dawn of Art: The Chauvet Cave, The Oldest Known Paintings in the World by Jean-Marie Chauvet, by Eliette Brunel Deschamps, by Christian Hillaire

The Cave Beneath the Sea: Paleolithic Images at Cosquer by Jean Clottes, by Jean Courtin

Hungary’s Revolution: Forty Years On

The Hungarian Revolution of 1956: Reform, Revolt and Repression, 1953-1963 H. Legers. edited by György Litván. English version edited and translated by János M. Bak and Lyman

Hungary’s Negotiated Revolution: Economic Reform, Social Change, and Political Succession, 1957-1990 by Rudolf L. Tokés

The Painful Comedy of Samuel Beckett

Damned to Fame: The Life of Samuel Beckett by James Knowlson

Samuel Beckett: The Last Modernist by Anthony Cronin

The World of Samuel Beckett, 1906-1946 by Lois Gordon

The Complete Short Prose, 1929-1989 edited by S.E. Gontarski

Eleutheria by Samuel Beckett, translated by Michael Brodsky

Nohow On: Company, Ill Seen Ill Said, Worstward Ho by Samuel Beckett

Tragedy in Cambodia

The Pol Pot Regime: Race, Power, and Genocide in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge, 1975-79 by Ben Kiernan

Gecko Tails by Carol Livingston

Propaganda, Politics and Violence in Cambodia: Democratic Transition Under United Nations Peace-keeping edited by Steve Heder, edited by Judy Ledgerwood

Contributors

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of many novels, including The Book of Evidence, The Untouchable, Eclipse, The Sea (winner of the Man Booker Prize), and Ancient Light. As Benjamin Black he has written six crime novels, including Vengeance.

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

Jared Diamond, Professor of Geography and Physiology at UCLA, is the author most recently of Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed. (June 2012)

Rosemary Dinnage’s books include The Ruffian on the Stair, One to One: Experiences of Psychotherapy, and Annie Besant.

Caroline Fraser ‘s most recent book, Rewilding the World: Dispatches from the Conservation Revolution, was published in December. (May 2010)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He currently leads the Free Speech Debate project at Oxford (freespeechdebate.com) and is writing a book about free speech.


Ernst Gombrich (1909–2001) was an Austrian art historian. Born in Vienna, Gombrich studied at the Theresianum and then at the University of Vienna under Julius von Schlosser. After graduating, he worked as a Research Assistant and collaborator with the museum curator and Freudian analyst Ernst Kris. He joined the Warburg Institute in London as a Research Assistant in 1936 and was named Director in 1959. His major works include The Story of Art, Art and Illusion: A Study in the Psychology of Pictorial Representation, Aby Warburg: An Intellectual Biography, The Sense of Order: A Study in the Psychology of Decorative Art.

Jasper Griffin is Emeritus Professor of Classical Literature and a Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. His books include Homer on Life and Death.

Christopher Hitchens (1949–2011) was a British-American journalist and social critic. Known for his confrontational style and contrarian views on a range of social issues, Hitchens was a frequent contributor to The Nation, The Atlantic, The Times Literary Supplement and Vanity Fair. Hitchens recounts his struggle with esophageal cancer in Mortality, which was published in 2012.

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Eric L. McKitrick (1920–2002) was a historian of the United States. Educated at Columbia, McKitrick taught at the University of Chicago and Rutgers before returning to Columbia in 1960. He is perhaps best known for Andrew Johnson and Reconstruction; his other works treated slavery and the American South, as well as the history of the American party system.

Louis Menand is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of English at Harvard. His books include The Marketplace of Ideas, American Studies and The Metaphysical Club.

Czeslaw Milosz (1911–2004) was born in Szetejnie, Lithuania. Over the course of his long and prolific career he published works in many genres, including criticism (The Captive Mind), fiction (The Issa Valley), memoir (Native Realm), and poetry (New and Collected Poems, 1931-2001). He was a member of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1980.

Amos Oz teaches literature at Ben Gurion University. He is the author of A Tale of Love and Darkness and, most recently, Rhyming Life and Death. (November 2010)

Charles Rosen is a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

William Shawcross is the author of several books on Cambodia. (December 1996)

Garry Wills is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern. His new book, Making Make-Believe Real: Politics as Theater in Shakespeare’s Time, will be published in the summer 2014.