Contents


The Not Very Grand Inquisitor

Communication from the Office of the Independent Counsel, Kenneth W. Starr: Appendices to the Referral to the United States House of Representatives pursuant to Title 28, United States Code, å¤595(c), Parts 1 and 2 Submitted by the Office of the Independent Counsel

…And the Horse He Rode In On: The People v. Kenneth Starr by James Carville

The Clinton Enigma: A Four-and-a-Half-Minute Speech Reveals This President’s Entire Life by David Maraniss

Believe It or Not

A Collector’s Cabinet 17-November 1, 1998. exhibition at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., May, Catalog of the exhibition byWheelock, Arthur K. Jr.

Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150-1750 by Lorraine Daston, by Katharine Park

Special Cases: Natural Anomalies and Historical Monsters by Rosamond Purcell

Escape Artists

The Last Resort by Alison Lurie

Park City: New and Selected Stories by Ann Beattie

A Patchwork Planet by Anne Tyler

Iran’s Unlikely President

Hope and Challenge: The Iranian President Speaks by Mohammad Khatami, edited by Parviz Morewedge, by Kent P. Jackson, translated by Alidad Mafinezam

Bim-e Mowj [Fear of the Wave] by Mohammad Khatami

Az Donya-ye Shahr ta Shahr-e Donya: Sayri dar Andisheh-ye Siyasi-ye Gharb [From the World of the City to the City of the World: A Survey of Western Political Thought] by Mohammad Khatami

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Shaul Bakhash is Robinson Professor of History at George Mason University and the author of The Reign of the Ayatollahs: Iran and the Islamic Revolution. (September 2005)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Howard Gardner teaches psychology at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His most recent book, with Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and William Damon, is Good Work: When Excellence and Ethics Meet. (April 2002)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He currently leads the Free Speech Debate project at Oxford (freespeechdebate.com) and is writing a book about free speech.


Anthony Grafton is Henry Putnam University Professor of History and the Humanities at Princeton University. His most recent book is The Culture of Correction in Renaissance Europe.


James Lasdun was born in London and now lives in upstate New York. He has published three books of poetry—A Jump Start, Woman Police Officer in Elevator, and Landscape with Chainsaw—and three collections of short stories, most recently Besieged (Selected Stories), of which the title story was made into a film by Bernardo Bertolucci.

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Hilary Mantel is an English novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her novel, Wolf Hall, won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

William H. McNeill is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Chicago. His most recent books are The Pursuit of Truth: A Historian’s Memoir and Summers Long Ago: On Grandfather’s Farm and in Grandmother’s Kitchen, published by the Berkshire Publishing Group. His most recent publication, as editor, is the second edition of the Encyclopedia of World History.

James Merrill (1926–1995) was an American poet whose major work The Changing Light at Sandover describes a series of spirit communications conducted over many years. He won the National Book Award from his collections Nights and Days and Mirabell: Books of Number.

Lars-Erik Nelson (1941-2000) was the Washington columnist for the New York Daily News, and a frequent contributor to the Review.

John Ryle is Chair of the Rift Valley Institute, a network of regional specialists working in East and Northeast Africa. (August 2004)

Robert M. Solow, Institute Professor Emeritus of Economics at MIT, won the 1987 Nobel Prize in economics. His most recent book is Work and Welfare. (May 2009)

Robert Stone was born in Brooklyn in 1937. He is the author of seven novels: A Hall of Mirrors, the National Book Award–winning Dog Soldiers, A Flag for Sunrise, Children of Light, Outerbridge Reach, Damascus Gate, and Bay of Souls. He has also written short stories, essays, and screenplays, and published a short story collection, Bear and His Daughter, which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. He lives in New York City and in Key West, Florida.