Contents


Let’s Face the Music

Annie Get Your Gun music and lyrics by Irving Berlin, book by Herbert and Dorothy Fields, as revised by Peter Stone, directed by Graciela Daniele, starring Bernadette Peters. at the Marquis Theater, New York City

Irving Berlin: American Troubadour by Edward Jablonski

Irving Berlin: A Life in Song by Philip Furia

Irving Berlin: A Daughter’s Memoir by Mary Ellin Barrett

The Top Designer

Cats’ Paws and Catapults: Mechanical Worlds of Nature and People by Steven Vogel, illustrated by Kathryn K. Davis and Steven Vogel

Of Flies, Mice, and Men by François Jacob, translated by Giselle Weiss

An Ardor for Armor

Heroic Armor of the Italian Renaissance: Filippo Negroli and His Contemporaries 1998-January 17, 1999. an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, October 8,, Catalog of the exhibition by Stuart W. Pyhrr and José-A. Godoy

Arms and Armor: The Cleveland Museum of Art by Stephen N. Fliegel

Arms and Armor in The Art Institute of Chicago by Walter J. Karcheski Jr.

Contributors

Robert Cottrell is Editor of The Browser. He has served as Moscow bureau chief for both The Economist and the Financial Times. (December 2017)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (October 2017)

Thomas Flanagan (1923–2002), the grandson of Irish immigrants, grew up in Greenwich, Connecticut, where he ran the school newspaper with his friend Truman Capote. Flanagan attended Amherst College (with a two-year hiatus to serve in the Pacific Fleet) and earned his Ph.D. from Columbia University, where he studied under Lionel Trilling while also writing stories for Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. In 1959, he published an important scholarly work, The Irish Novelists, 1800 to 1850, and the next year he moved to Berkeley, where he was to teach English and Irish literature at the University of California for many years. In 1978 he took up a post at the State University of New York at Stonybrook, from which he retired in 1996. Flanagan and his wife Jean made annual trips to Ireland, where he struck up friendships with many writers, including Benedict Kiely and Seamus Heaney, whom he in turn helped bring to the United States. His intimate knowledge of Ireland’s history and literature also helped to inspire his trilogy of historical novels, starting with The Year of the French (1979, winner of the National Critics’ Circle award for fiction, reissued by NYRB Classics in 2004) and continuing with The Tenants of Time (1988) and The End of the Hunt (1994). He is also the author of There You Are: Writings on Irish and American Literature and History (2004). Flanagan was a frequent contributor to many publications, including The New York Review of Books, The New York Times, and The Kenyon Review.

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. His most recent book is Free Speech: Ten Principles for a Connected World.
 (December 2017)

Malcolm Gladwell is the author of The Tipping Point: How Little Things Make a Big Difference. An archive of his articles for The New Yorker is available at www.gladwell.com. (February 2000)

Stuart Hampshire (1914–2004) was an English philosopher. He taught at University College London, Princeton, Stanford and Oxford, where he was named Warden of Wadham College. His books include Thought and Action, Spinoza and Justice Is Conflict.

Elizabeth Hardwick (1916–2007) was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and educated at the University of Kentucky and Columbia University. A recipient of a Gold Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she is the author of three novels, a biography of Herman Melville, and four collections of essays. She was a co-founder and advisory editor of The New York Review of Books and contributed more than one hundred reviews, articles, reflections, and letters to the magazine. NYRB Classics publishes Sleepless Nights, a novel, and Seduction and Betrayal, a study of women in literature.

Christopher Hitchens (1949–2011) was a British-American journalist and social critic. Known for his confrontational style and contrarian views on a range of social issues, Hitchens was a frequent contributor to The Nation, The Atlantic, The Times Literary Supplement and Vanity Fair. Hitchens recounts his struggle with esophageal cancer in Mortality, which was published in 2012.

Richard Holmes books include Shelley, Footsteps, Coleridge, The Age of Wonder, and, most recently, Falling Upwards: How We Took to the Air. His memoir This Long Pursuit will be published next spring.
 (November 2016)

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. She is the author of Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce, among other novels, and a memoir, Flyover Lives.
 (October 2017)

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

M. F. Perutz (1914–2002) was an Austrian molecular biologist. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1962. He is the author of Is Science Necessary?, Protein Structure, and I Wish I’d Made You Angry Earlier.

Jean Strouse, Director of the Dorothy and Lewis B. ­Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York 
Public Library and the author of Alice James, A Biography and Morgan: American Financier, is writing a book about John Singer Sargent’s twelve portraits of the Asher Wertheimer family.


Christopher de Bellaigue’s most recent book is The Islamic Enlightenment: The Struggle Between Faith and Reason, 1798 to Modern Times. (July 2017)