Contents


Gore in the Balance

Inventing Al Gore by Bill Turque

The Prince of Tennessee: The Rise of Al Gore by David Maraniss and Ellen Nakashima

In Praise of Public Life by Joseph I. Lieberman, with Michael D'Orso

Mr. Bigsky

Godfather of the Kremlin: Boris Berezovsky and the Looting of Russia by Paul Klebnikov

Sale of the Century: Russia’s Wild Ride from Communism to Capitalism by Chrystia Freeland

The Desert Prince

Rudy! An Investigative Biography of Rudolph Giuliani by Wayne Barrett, with Adam Fifield

Rudy Giuliani: Emperor of the City by Andrew Kirtzman

Paroxysms of Choice

Charter Schools in Action: Renewing Public Education by Chester E. Finn Jr. and Bruce V. Manno and Gregg Vanourek

When Schools Compete: A Cautionary Tale by Edward B. Fiske and Helen F. Ladd

Inside Charter Schools: The Paradox of Radical Decentralization edited by Bruce Fuller

A Legacy of Learning: Your Stake in Standards and New Kinds of Public Schools by David T. Kearns and James Harvey. with a foreword by George Bush

The Market Approach to Education: An Analysis of America’s First Voucher Program by John F. Witte

Contributors

Isaiah Berlin (1909–1997) was a philosopher and historian of ideas who held the Chichele Professorship of Social and Political Theory at Oxford. The final volume of his correspondence, Affirming: Letters 1975–1997, was published in December 2015.

Robert Cottrell is Editor of The Browser. He has served as Moscow bureau chief for both The Economist and the Financial Times. (December 2017)

Benjamin M. Friedman is the William Joseph Maier Professor of Political Economy at Harvard and the author of The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth.

 He is currently finishing a book on the historical influence of religious thinking on economic thinking.(October 2017)

Howard Gardner teaches psychology at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His most recent book, with Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and William Damon, is Good Work: When Excellence and Ethics Meet. (April 2002)

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. She is the author of Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce, among other novels, and a memoir, Flyover Lives.
 (October 2017)

Daniel Mendelsohn, a longtime contributor to The New York Review, teaches at Bard. His new memoir, An Odyssey: A ­Father, a Son, and an Epic, will be published in September.
 (April 2017)

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

Lars-Erik Nelson (1941-2000) was the Washington columnist for the New York Daily News, and a frequent contributor to the Review.

Joyce Carol Oates’s Beautiful Days, a collection of stories, will be published in February. She is currently Distinguished Writer in Residence in the Graduate Program at NYU. (December 2017)

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. His latest book is Scribbled in the Dark, a volume of poetry. (November 2017)

Tom Stoppard’s most recent play, The Invention of Love, will have its first American productions in January at the American Conservatory Theater, San Francisco, and in February at the Wilma Theater, Philadelphia. (September 1999)

James Traub is a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine. He is currently writing a book about Times Square. (February 2002)

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

John Weightman (1915–2004) was a critic and literary scholar. After working as a translator and announcer for the BBC French service, Weightman turned to the study of French literature. He taught at King’s College London and the University of London. His books include The Concept of the Avant-Gardeand The Cat Sat on the Mat: Language and the Absurd.