Contents


Fate & the Führer

Hitler, 1936-1945: Nemesis by Ian Kershaw

The Third Reich: A New History by Michael Burleigh

The Social History of the Third Reich, 1933-1945 by Pierre Ayçoberry, Translated from the French by Janet Lloyd

The Genius of Robert Walser

The Robber by Robert Walser, Translated from the German and with an introduction by Susan Bernofsky

Jakob von Gunten by Robert Walser, Translated from the German and with an introduction by Christopher Middleton

Dürer and Christ

Dürer’s Passions September 9-December 3, 2000 by an exhibition at the Fogg Art Museum, Cambridge, Massachusetts,, album of the exhibition, with a separately bound essay Jordan Kantor, foreword by Joseph Leo Koerner

Pulpmaster

Zane Grey: Romancing the West by Stephen J. May

Maverick Heart: The Further Adventures of Zane Grey by Stephen J. May

In the Primordial Soup

The Spark of Life: Darwin and the Primeval Soup by Christopher Wills, by Jeffrey Bada

Darwin’s Ghost: The Origin of Species Updated by Steve Jones

The Skeleton in the Closet

Slave Narratives edited by William L. Andrews, by Henry Louis Gates Jr.

Born in Bondage: Growing Up Enslaved in the Antebellum South by Marie Jenkins Schwartz

Soul by Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market by Walter Johnson

Contributors

David Kahn is the author of The Codebreakers. (November 2000)

Maya Lin is an artist/architect who lives in New York City. The essay in this issue is drawn from her book Boundaries, just published by Simon and Schuster. (November 2000)

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

Daniel Mendelsohn was born in 1960 and studied classics at the University of Virginia and at Princeton, where he received his doctorate. His essays and reviews appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times Book Review. His books include The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; a memoir, The Elusive Embrace; and the collection Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture, published by New York Review Books. He teaches at Bard College. His essay in the September 25, 2014 issue will appear as the introduction to a new translation of The Bacchae by Robin Robertson, to be published in September by Ecco.

Czeslaw Milosz (1911–2004) was born in Szetejnie, Lithuania. Over the course of his long and prolific career he published works in many genres, including criticism (The Captive Mind), fiction (The Issa Valley), memoir (Native Realm), and poetry (New and Collected Poems, 1931-2001). He was a member of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1980.

Joyce Carol Oates was Stein Visiting Writer at Stanford for the spring 2015 term. Her most recent novel is Jack of Spades. Her ­essay in the August 13, 2015 issue was delivered as the Robert B. Silvers Lecture at the 
New York Public Library in December 2014.


Thomas Powers is the author of The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA (1979), Heisenberg’s War: The Secret History of the German Bomb (1993), Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda (2002; revised and expanded edition, 2004), and The Confirmation (2000), a novel. He won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1971 and has contributed to The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, The Nation, The Atlantic, and Rolling Stone. His latest book, The Killing of Crazy Horse, won the 2011 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History. He is currently writing a memoir of his father, who once told him that the last time he met Clare Boothe Luce was in the office of Allen Dulles.


John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit: Angstrom, he two of which, Rabbit is Richand Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Bernard Williams (1929–2003) was Deutsch Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley, and a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. His books include *Problems of the Self*, *Moral Luck*, *Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy*, and *Truth and Truthfulness*.