Contents


Living on the Wind

Eye of the Albatross: Visions of Hope and Survival by Carl Safina

Sailing Alone Around the World by Captain Joshua Slocum

Morning in America

Elvis in the Morning by William F. Buckley Jr.

Let Us Talk of Many Things: The Collected Speeches by William F. Buckley Jr.

Nuremberg: The Reckoning by William F. Buckley Jr.

Laxness the Great

Paradise Reclaimed by Halldór Laxness, translated from the Icelandic by Magnus Magnusson, with an introduction by Jane Smiley

The Fish Can Sing by Halldór Laxness, translated from the Icelandic by Magnus Magnusson

Whose War Is It?

Supreme Command: Soldiers, Statesmen, and Leadership in Wartime by Eliot A. Cohen

The Art of War: War and Military Thought by Martin van Creveld

Secrets of September 11

The Bureau: The Secret History of the FBI by Ronald Kessler

Black Mass: The True Story of an Unholy Alliance Between the FBI and the Irish Mob by Dick Lehr and Gerard O'Neill

See No Evil: The True Story of a Ground Soldier in the CIA’s War on Terrorism by Robert Baer

Al-Qaeda: In Search of the Terror Network that Threatens the World by Jane Corbin

The Cell: Inside the 9/11 Plot, and Why the FBI and CIA Failed to Stop It by John Miller and Michael Stone, with Chris Mitchell

Inside Al Qaeda: Global Network of Terror by Rohan Gunaratna

Contributors

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Tim Flannery is the author of Chasing Kangaroos: A Continent, a Scientist, and a Search for the World’s Most Extraordinary Creature and, most recently, Atmosphere of Hope: Searching for Solutions to the Climate Crisis. (September 2017)

Bruce Gilley is a doctoral student in politics at Princeton University and a former contributing editor at the Far Eastern Economic Review. He is the author of the forthcoming China’s Democratic Future, Model Rebels: The Rise and Fall of China’s Richest Village, and Tiger on the Brink: Jiang Zemin and China’s New Elite.

Alma Guillermoprieto is a frequent contributor to The New York Review, often writing on Latin America. She is the author of Dancing with Cuba: A Memoir of the Revolution, among other books.
 (May 2016)

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. His books include The Art of Stillness and The Man Within My Head.
 (June 2017)

Lance Larsen is the author of Erasable Walls, a collection of poems. (October 2002)

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Daniel Mendelsohn, a longtime contributor to The New York Review, teaches at Bard. His new memoir, An Odyssey: A ­Father, a Son, and an Epic, will be published in September.
 (April 2017)

Martin Meyer is literary editor of the Neue Zürcher Zeitung and the author of several books, including volumes on Ernst Junger and Thomas Mann. (October 2002)

Lorrie Moore is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English at Vanderbilt and the author of four story collections and three novels. Her most recent novel is A Gate at the Stairs and her most recent collection of stories is Bark. (August 2017)

Andrew J. Nathan is the Class of 1919 Professor of ­Political Science at Columbia. His books include China’s Search for ­Security, cowritten with Andrew Scobell. (October 2017)

Thomas Powers’s books include The Confirmation, a novel, and The Killing of Crazy Horse. (April 2017)

Ahmed Rashid is the author of Pakistan on the Brink: The Future of America, Pakistan, and Afghanistan and several books on Afghanistan and Central Asia. He lives in Lahore. (November 2016)

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life.