Contents


Eyeless in Iraq

America Unbound: The Bush Revolutionin Foreign Policy by Ivo H. Daalder and James M. Lindsay

The George W. Bush Presidency: An Early Assessment edited by Fred I. Greenstein

Blair in Trouble

Thirty Days: Tony Blair and the Test of History by Peter Stothard

The Hutton Inquiry: Investigation into the Circumstances Surrounding the Death of Dr. David Kelly

Victory at Bunker Hill

Symphony: Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall with an introduction by Frank Gehry and a preface by Deborah Borda; essays by Richard Koshalek and Dana Hutt, Carol McMichael Reese, Michael Webb, and Esa-Pekka Salonen; and photographs by Grant Mudford

Frank O. Gehry: Work in Progress

Contributors

General Wesley K. Clark, USA (Ret.), was Supreme Allied Commander, Europe, from 1997 to 2000, a military analyst for CNN from 2001 to 2003, and is chairman of Wesley K. Clark & Associates. The article in this issue is based on his new book, Winning Modern Wars: Iraq, Terrorism, and the American Empire, to be published this month by Public Affairs, a member of the Perseus Books Group. (October 2003)

J.M. Coetzee is Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide. He is the author of sixteen works of fiction, as well as many works of criticism and translation. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003.
 (January 2017)

Amos Elon (1926–2009) was an Israeli journalist. His final book was The Pity of It All: A Portrait of Jews In Germany 1743 – 1933.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (August 2017)

Orlando Figes is Professor of History at Birkbeck College, University of London. He is the author, most recently, of Revolutionary Russia, 1891–1991: A History.
 (May 2017)

Martin Filler is the 2017 recipient of the Stephen A. Kliment ­Oculus Award, given by the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, for his architecture criticism, which has appeared in these pages since 1985.
 (August 2017)

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. She is the author of Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce, among other novels, and a memoir, Flyover Lives.
 (February 2017)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Anthony Lewis, a former columnist for The New York Times, has twice won the Pulitzer Prize. His latest book is Freedom for the Thought That We Hate: A Biography of the First Amendment.

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

Joyce Carol Oates is the author, most recently, of A Book of American Martyrs. She is Professor Emerita of Humanities at Princeton and currently a Visiting Professor in the English Department at the University of California, Berkeley. (April 2017)

Birger A. Pearson is Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. (October 2003)

Sheila M. Rothman is Professor of Public Health at the Mailman School, Columbia University. Their books written together include The Willowbrook Wars: A Decade of Struggle for Social Justice (1984) and The Pursuit of Perfection: The Promise and Perils of Medical Enhancement (2003).

David J. Rothman is Bernard Schoenberg Professor of Social Medicine and History at the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons and president of the Institute on Medicine as a Professor.

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. (1917–2007) was an American historian and social critic. He served as adviser to Presidents Kennedy and Johnson. His Journals: 1952– 2000 were published in 2007.

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. His new book, Scribbled in the Dark, a volume of poetry, will be published in June.
 (June 2017)

Robert Winter is Distinguished Professor of Music and holds the Presidential Chair in Music and Interactive Arts at UCLA. He is about to release Music in the Air, the first all-digital history of Western music.(April 2016)