Contents


Virtual Violence

The Scarlet Gang of Asakusa by Yasunari Kawabata, translated from the Japanese by Alisa Freedman, with a foreword and afterword by Donald Richie and illustrations by Ota Saburo

Little Boy: The Arts of Japan’s Exploding Subculture Catalog of the exhibition edited by Murakami Takashi

In Love with Jane

A Fine Brush on Ivory: An Appreciation of Jane Austen by Richard Jenkyns

Novel Relations: The Transformation of Kinshipin English Literature and Culture, 1748–1818 by Ruth Perry

Jane Austen by Darryl Jones

Searching for Jane Austen by Emily Auerbach

Jane Austen and the Enlightenment by Peter Knox-Shaw

Jane Austen and the Romantic Poets by William Deresiewicz

Contributors

Louis Begley’s books include Why the Dreyfus Affair Matters and the novel Wartime Lies. His eleventh novel, Killer Come Hither, will be published in 2015.

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written over seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty. His ­memoir, A Tokyo Romance, has just been published. (April 2018)

Constantine Cavafy was born in Alexandria in 1863 and died there in 1933. He wrote most of his poems while employed in the Third Circle of Irrigation of the Ministry of Public Works. (June 2005)

Richard Crampton is Professor of East European History and Fellow of St. Edmund Hall, Oxford. He is the author of Eastern Europe in the Twentieth Century, The Balkans Since the Second World War, and a number of histories of Bulgaria. (June 2005)

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His most recent book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War. His work can be found at www
.markdanner.com.
 (March 2017)

Elizabeth Drew is the author of fourteen books, including Washington Journal: Reporting Watergate and Richard Nixon’s Downfall, which was expanded and reissued in 2014.

Peter France is Professor Emeritus of French at the University of Edinburgh and the editor of The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French. The poem in the May 8, 2014 issue is included in Poems of Osip Mandelstam, translated and with a foreword by Peter France, to be published by New Directions in June 2014. 
(May 2014)

David Gilmour’s books include The Last Leopard: A Life of Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa and The Pursuit of Italy: A 
History of a Land, Its Regions, and Their Peoples.
 (March 2014)

David Hajdu, author of Lush Life and Positively 4th Street, teaches at Syracuse University and is music critic for The New Republic. (June 2005)

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. She is the author of Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce, among other novels, and a memoir, Flyover Lives.
 (October 2017)

Mark Lilla is Professor of Humanities at Columbia. With New York Review Books he has published The Shipwrecked Mind: On Political Reaction (2016), The Reckless Mind: Intellectuals in Politics (2nd. ed., 2016), and, with Robert Silvers and Ronald Dworkin, The Legacy of Isaiah Berlin (2001). His other books include G.B. Vico: The Making of an Anti-Modern (1994), The Stillborn God: Religion, Politics, and the Modern West (2007), and, most recently, The Once and Future Liberal: On Political Reaction (2017). He was the 2015 Overseas Press Club of America winner of the Best Commentary on International News in Any Medium for his New York Review series “On France.” Visit marklilla.com.

Daniel Mendelsohn, a longtime contributor to The New York Review, teaches at Bard. His new memoir, An Odyssey: A ­Father, a Son, and an Epic, will be published in September.
 (April 2017)

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. His books include From the Ruins of Empire: The Revolt Against the West and the Remaking of Asia and Age of Anger: A History of the Present.
 (December 2017)

Jonathan Raban’s books include Surveillance, My Holy War, Arabia, Old Glory, Hunting Mister Heartbreak, Bad Land, Passage to Juneau, and Waxwings. His most recent book is Driving Home: An American Journey, published in 2011. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, the PEN/West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, and the Governor’s Award of the State of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, and The Independent. He lives in Seattle.

Alan Ryan is the author of On Tocqueville, On Marx, and the two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought from Herodotus to the Present. 
(January 2018)

Cathleen Schine’s latest novel is They May Not Mean to but They Do. (February 2018)