Contents


Killing Cures

Madhouse: A Tragic Tale of Megalomania and Modern Medicine by Andrew Scull

The Lobotomist: A Maverick Medical Genius and His Tragic Quest to Rid the World of Mental Illness by Jack El-Hai

Endgame

America’s Environmental Report Card: Are We Making the Grade? by Harvey Blatt

Crimes Against Nature: How George W. Bush and His Corporate Pals Are Plundering the Country and Hijacking Our Democracy by Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

One with Nineveh: Politics, Consumption, and the Human Future by Paul R. Ehrlich and Anne H. Ehrlich

Diamond: A Struggle for Environmental Justice in Louisiana’s Chemical Corridor by Steve Lerner

Climate Change: Debating America’s Policy Options by David G. Victor

The Real Environmental Crisis: Why Poverty, Not Affluence, Is the Environment’s Number One Enemy by Jack M. Hollander

The Solitary Notetaker

Campo Santo by W.G. Sebald, translated from the German by Anthea Bell

Unrecounted by W.G. Sebald, translated from the German by Michael Hamburger, with lithographs by Jan Peter Tripp

The Truth About Jihad

Osama: The Making of a Terrorist by Jonathan Randal

Globalized Islam: The Search for a New Ummah by Olivier Roy

The War for Muslim Minds: Islam and the West by Gilles Kepel,translated from the French by Pascale Ghazaleh

Understanding Terror Networks by Marc Sageman

Landscapes of the Jihad: Militancy, Morality and Modernity by Faisal Devji

Contributors

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His most recent book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War. His work can be found at www
.markdanner.com.
 (March 2017)

Joan Didion is the author, most recently, of Blue Nights and The Year of Magical Thinking, among seven other works of nonfiction. Her five novels include A Book of Common Prayer and Democracy.
 (May 2016)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (October 2017)

Tim Flannery is the author of Chasing Kangaroos: A Continent, a Scientist, and a Search for the World’s Most Extraordinary Creature and, most recently, Atmosphere of Hope: Searching for Solutions to the Climate Crisis. (September 2017)

Peter W. Galbraith is a former US ambassador to Croatia and assistant secretary general of the United Nations in Afghanistan. He is the author of two books on the Iraq War, The End of Iraq: How American Incompetence Created a War Without End and Unintended Consequences: How War in Iraq Strengthened America’s Enemies.

John Gray is Emeritus Professor of European Thought at the London School of Economics. His latest book is The Soul of the Marionette: A Short Inquiry into Human Freedom.
 (October 2017)

Alan Hollinghurst’s s new novel, The Sparsholt Affair, will be published in the US next spring. (August 2017)

Tim Judah is a correspondent for The Economist. He has ­reported for The New York Review from, among other places, ­Afghanistan, Serbia, Uganda, and Armenia.
 (May 2017)

Michael Kimmelman is a longtime critic for The New York Times. A version of his essay in this issue will appear in the collection City Squares: Eighteen Writers on the Spirit and Significance of Squares Around the World, edited by Catie Marron and published in April by Harper.
 (April 2016)

Lorrie Moore is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English at Vanderbilt and the author of four story collections and three novels. Her most recent novel is A Gate at the Stairs and her most recent collection of stories is Bark. (August 2017)

Caroline Moorehead is the author most recently of A Train in Winter, the first volume of her trilogy on resistance in World War II. The second volume, Village of Secrets: Defying the Nazis in Vichy France, will be published in October. (June 2014)

Sherwin B. Nuland is Clinical Professor of Surgery and a Fellow of the Institution for Social and Policy Studies at Yale. He is the author of How We Die, which won the National Book Award in 1994, and Lost in America. (December 2005)

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His books include Sonata for Jukebox and Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012.
 (September 2017)

Max Rodenbeck is the Middle East Bureau Chief of The Economist. (December 2015)

Norman Rush’s most recent novel is Subtle Bodies. (April 2017)

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. His latest book is Scribbled in the Dark, a volume of poetry. (November 2017)

Hilary Spurling’s books include Pearl Buck in China: Journey to the Good Earth and a biography of Henri Matisse. Her biography of Anthony Powell, Dancing to the Music of Time, will be published in the US next year. (November 2017)

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life.

Christopher de Bellaigue’s most recent book is The Islamic Enlightenment: The Struggle Between Faith and Reason, 1798 to Modern Times. (July 2017)