Contents


Blogs

We’ve Got Blog: How Weblogs Are Changing Our Culture compiled and edited by John Rodzvilla, with an introduction by Rebecca Blood

Against the Machine: Being Human in the Age of the Electronic Mob by Lee Siegel

Republic.com 2.0 by Cass R. Sunstein

Blogwars by David D. Perlmutter

The Future of Reputation: Gossip, Rumor, and Privacy on the Internet by Daniel J. Solove

We’re All Journalists Now: The Transformation of the Press and Reshaping of the Lawin the Internet Age by Scott Gant

Blog: Understanding the Information Reformation That’s Changing Your World by Hugh Hewitt

The Cult of the Amateur: How Today’s Internet Is Killing Our Culture by Andrew Keen

Naked Conversations: How Blogs Are Changing the Way Businesses Talk with Customers by Robert Scoble and Shel Israel, foreword by Tom Peters

Blog! How the Newest Media Revolution Is Changing Politics, Business, and Culture by David Kline and Dan Burstein

Olmert & Israel: The Change

Lords of the Land: The War Over Israel’s Settlements in the Occupied Territories, 1967–2007 by Idith Zertal and Akiva Eldar, translated from the Hebrew by Vivian Eden

Walled: Israeli Society at an Impasse by Sylvain Cypel

Son of the Cypresses: Memories, Reflections, and Regrets from a Political Life by Meron Benvenisti, translated from the Hebrew by Maxine Kaufman-Lacusta, in consultation with Michael Kaufman-Lacusta

The Born Rebel Artist

Gustave Courbet Catalog of the exhibition by Sylvain Amic, Kathryn Calley Galitz, Laurence des Cars, Dominique de Font-Réaulx, Thomas Galifot, Michel Hilaire, Dominique Lobstein, Bruno Mottin, and Bertrand Tillier

The Most Arrogant Man in France: Gustave Courbet and the Nineteenth-Century Media Culture by Petra ten-Doesschate Chu

L’Origine du monde: Histoire d’un tableau de Gustave Courbet by Thierry Savatier

Courbet by Linda Nochlin

The Revolt of the Monks

Crackdown: Repression of the 2007 Popular Protests in Burma a report by Human Rights Watch

Making Enemies: War and State Building in Burma by Mary P. Callahan

The River of Lost Footsteps: A Personal History of Burma by Thant Myint-U

“Burma/Myanmar: The Role of the Military in the Economy” by David I. Steinberg

He Won’t Give In

Confessions: An Innocent Life in Communist China by Kang Zhengguo, translated from the Chinese by Susan Wilf, with an introduction by Perry Link

Contributors

Anne Applebaum is a columnist for The Washington Post and Slate, and runs the Transitions Forum at the Legatum Institute. Her most recent book is Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944–1956. (April 2016)

Sarah Boxer is a contributing writer for The Atlantic and the author of In the Floyd Archives: A Psycho-Bestiary.
 (October 2016)

Frederick C. Crews’s new book, Freud: The Making of an Illusion, will be published in the fall.
 (February 2017)

Joan Didion is the author, most recently, of Blue Nights and The Year of Magical Thinking, among seven other works of nonfiction. Her five novels include A Book of Common Prayer and Democracy.
 (May 2016)

Amos Elon (1926–2009) was an Israeli journalist. His final book was The Pity of It All: A Portrait of Jews In Germany 1743 – 1933.

John Golding (1929–2012) was a British painter and art historian. He taught at the Courtauld Institute and the Royal College of Art. Among his many books was Cubism: A History and an Analysis, which refuted the notion that Cubism represented a break with the realist tradition. Golding also curated exhibitions on both sides of the Atlantic, including Picasso: Painter/Sculpter and Matisse Picasso.

Alan Hollinghurst’s s new novel, The Sparsholt Affair, will be published in the US next spring. (August 2017)

Evan Hughes is on the editorial staff of The New York Review of Books. (March 2006)

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. She is the author of Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce, among other novels, and a memoir, Flyover Lives.
 (February 2017)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Richard C. Lewontin is Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Biology at Harvard University. He is the author of The Genetic Basis of Evolutionary Change and Biology as Ideology, and the co-author of The Dialectical Biologist (with Richard Levins) and Not in Our Genes (with Steven Rose and Leon Kamin).

James McPherson is George Henry Davis ’86 Professor of American History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1989, and, most ­recently, The War That Forged a Nation: Why the Civil War Still Matters.
 (October 2016)

W.S. Merwin was born in New York City in 1927 and grew up in Union City, New Jersey, and in Scranton, Pennsylvania. From 1949 to 1951 he worked as a tutor in France, Portugal, and Majorca. He has since lived in many parts of the world, most recently on Maui in the Hawaiian Islands. He is the author of many books of poems, prose, and translations and has received both the Pulitzer and the Bollingen Prizes for poetry, among numerous other awards. His new poetry collection is The Moon Before Morning.

Claire Messud’s most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. (March 2017)

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China. He was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London and China Correspondent for The Observer.
 (December 2016)

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

John F. Murray is the author of Intensive Care: A Doctorå?s Journal. (October 2008)

Darryl Pinckney’s most recent book is a novel, Black Deutschland. (August 2017)

Frank Rich is a writer-at-large for New York magazine. His books include Ghost Light, a memoir, and The Greatest Story Ever Sold: The Decline and Fall of Truth in Bush’s America. He is an Executive Producer of the HBO series Veep.

Robin Robertson is from the northeast coast of Scotland. His fifth collection of poetry will be published next year. (June 2012)

Charles Rosen was a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Derek Walcott is a poet, playwright, essayist, and visual artist. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1992. (November 2016)